Convincing the masses

Watford Guide Editorial  —  By Jackie Rombouts

Many years ago a professor of mine once told me that in order to convince the masses of something, you must first discover what motivates them. This comment has stayed with me over the years and has served me well and it came to mind again today as I listened to Monte McNaughton and Bev Shipley discuss their views on why they have requested a moratorium for the continued industrial wind turbine developments and why they feel the government should rethink things before rushing into these expensive and inefficient projects.

Bev Shipley took the stance that health studies should be conducted before the projects should continue and I agree with him whole-heartedly. As a rural resident I am concerned for the health of my community who will be forced to reside beside these new developments, however I don’t think those who live in the city would really be all that concerned about the health and well being of those living close to the turbines. After all, I remind you of the comment given by one of the workers at the Zephyr project. He stated that it’s better for a few to suffer for the betterment of those in the city. So why should we care what the people in the city think? Well for one thing they make up the majority when it comes to voting rights and votes equal change in a democratic society. Those in political office need to respond to the majority or they won’t find themselves in office next term. So if the people in the larger urban centres don’t care about the well being of those in the rural communities and feel that the “green energy act will be in the best interest of all, what will motivate them to stand behind us to combat the building of more turbines?

The answer, I believe, came from Monte McNaughton who spoke about what those in the city really care about. Money. Plain and simple. If you really want the support of the urbanites, and let’s face it, we are outnumbered without them; the truth must be told to them how these wind turbines are going to hurt them. In the pocket book.

The cost to support this ‘green energy’ continues to rise and along with it, so will our hydro bills. The cost for hydro may not go up, but you can be sure that the delivery cost, the set cost that everyone needs to pay regardless of how much power they use, will increase substantially if we continue down this path. Small businesses will continue to close because they can no longer afford to pay for the power necessary to continue to operate.

So how can those of us from the rural community convince the masses in the urban centres that the Green Energy Bill is not in their best interests? By talking to them about how it will affect their bottom line. After all, it is ingrained in each of us to look after our own houses first, as evident in the pension plans we hear about from those on Parliament Hill. Despite the problems in the world economy and in Canada in particular, the key decision makers make sure that they will be well compensated first. Of course they do, wouldn’t you? It is our job as their constituents to hold them accountable for their decisions. If we are not happy about something, we need to speak up.

It is easy to complain about a situation to our friends and family but it is much harder to put your opinion onto paper and sign your name on it. Believe me, I know, as I have to do this very thing each week in my editorials. Writing letters to the Editor of the London Free Press, the Sarnia Observer, the Guide-Advocate or your local politician, is not an easy thing to do, but is one of the privileges that we as Canadians are afforded and should be doing on a regular basis.

Complaining to those around us may make us feel better, but it won’t change anything. In order to create change, we need to convince the masses.                                                                        …but that’s just my opinion 

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Posted on July 23, 2012, in Media, Take Action, Watford Guide Advocate. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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