Monthly Archives: April 2013

Suncor finally delivers a shadow flicker map for Adelaide Wind Project – 6 months late

shadow flicker

Adelaide Suncor Shadow Flicker Report

At the October 3, 2012 final public meeting for the Suncor Adelaide Wind Project, it became apparent that there was no Shadow Flicker information available for the public,  most importantly for those who would be affected by it. Questioning the Suncor dude about this he said he could get me the information for a specific area if I requested it. I said, “Oh good, I’d like it for the entire project”.

Clearly they didn’t take me seriously. We wrote the company and requested it again. The response from Chris Scott was, “In regards to your request for a “shadow-flicker” map, as requested at the October 3 Open House, we are currently preparing our shadow-flicker study. We will be sure to contact you when the study is completed.”

Months go on, and we attend the Cedar Point Suncor meeting in early April and ask where the Shadow Flicker report is. The response from C. Scott is “OK”. OK WHAT??? We stick the voice recorders on until he says we’ll get the report by the end of the month.

And here it is, 6 months after I first requested it. Note, the Adelaide project documents have since been deemed ‘complete’ by the Ministry of Environment, and put of for 45 days of public comment. Yes, it’s complete even without the shadow flicker reports because the Green Energy Act removed the requirement for the wind company to provide a shadow flicker report to the public.

So if you are one of the persons who will receive 40 minutes of shadow flicker a day ( like some will in this project), you would never have known about this flicker until it happened. How incredibly considerate of this wind company, Suncor, eh?

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Nextera Bornish wind project approved by MOE – 45 wind turbines

“If the Company determines that it must deviate from either the Environmental Effects Monitoring Plan, the Natural Heritage Assessment and Environmental Impact Study, the Natural Heritage Assessment – Addendum Report or the Natural Heritage Assessment – Addendum II Report, described in Condition K1, the Company shall contact the Ministry of Natural Resources and the Director, prior to making any changes to either of these documents, and follow any directions provided.

Full Bornish Wind Approval

Copy of IMG_0380

Active Eagle Nest 187m from Bornish substation, 634m & 741m from turbines.

Environmental Registry
Proponent:
Bornish Wind G.P Inc, as general partner for and on behalf of Bornish Wind L.P.
390 Bay Street, Suite 1720, Toronto Ontario Canada M5H 2Y2
Instrument Type:   Approval for a renewable energy project – EPA s.47.3(1)

A Renewable Energy Approval (REA) has been issued to Bornish Wind LP (NextEra Energy) to engage in a renewable energy project in respect of a Class 4 wind facility consisting of the construction, installation, operation, use and retiring of up to 45 turbines, rated at 1.6 MW generating output capacity, with a total name plate capacity of 72.9 MW. The wind facility will be connected to Hydro One’s distribution system.

This Class 4 wind facility, known as the Bornish Wind Energy Centre, consists of areas required for the wind facility components, as well as for the interconnection route. The wind facility will be is located in the Municipality of North Middlesex in Middlesex County.

The REA requires the proponent to construct, install, operate, use and retire the facility in accordance with specific terms and conditions.

The terms and conditions, as summarised below, require the proponent to:

  • construct and install the facility within 3 years of the date of the approval,
  • construct and install the facility in accordance with the documentation considered for the issuance of this approval,
  • receive all required permits under the Endangered Species Act, 2007 prior to construction or installation, Read the rest of this entry

Appalled by actions in Ontario legislature

Protest at Ontario Legislature

Larry Smale, Sarnia Observer
Myself and seven other friends, neighbors and the Mayor from Enniskillen Township, County of Lambton, Province of Ontario, Country of CANADA; attended the reading of Bill 39 in Toronto on Thursday, April 18. During the course of the day I was completely appalled by the misleading information and rhetoric coming from the Liberal side of the House as well as those of the NDP members. I wondered at times if these members had even read the bill.

Members from both of these parties talked out of both sides of their mouths. Prior to this bill all parties unanimously passed a bill to grant access to grandchildren by their grandparents where families had been subjected to divorce or other separation. Following this Bill they showed their true colours for the health, safety and consideration for the people of rural Ontario by defeating this bill, which as a result will allow the continuation of placing wind turbines in our back yards, next to us, next to our children and next to our grandchildren, an obvious disregard for the people of rural Ontario. Read article

Ontario government traded an active eagle nest for these 3 wind turbines

And here is why the active bald eagle nest was destroyed by Nextera, NexTerror, NextError, NestError…. What a @#$%ing disgrace!!
Nextera Eagle Nesterror

Reason to be skeptical

Mcguinty Killed DemocracyBy Peter Epp, Sarnia Observer
No matter what you think about wind turbines and whether or not they are the cause of some health problems, the fact the structures are not wanted by some municipalities remains the enduring issue in this part of Ontario. Indeed, some people seem to forget that municipalities like Enniskillen Township or the Town of Plympton-Wyoming are so dead set again wind turbines that they’re doing what they can to keep them out.

But because permission and planning for the towers’ development is tightly held by a provincial authority, as enforced by the four-year-old Green Energy Act, local councils can do little – even if their ratepayers are firmly against such development, and even if councillors share that same opposition.

Indeed, the legacy of the Green Energy Act isn’t green energy, but the ability of a central political power to overrule the will of locally-elected politicians and their constituents. That legacy remains the number one threat. And every wind turbine remains a standing symbol of a senior government that purposely ignores the will of its junior government counterpart. Read article

Enniskillen Township citizens’ group spreading its message

enniskillenPaul Morden, Sarnia Observer
Chad Burke says he believes it’s possible to keep wind farms out of Enniskillen Township. Burke chairs the citizens’ group Conservation of Rural Enniskillen (CORE) that formed earlier this year after several wind companies became active seeking land to lease for turbine sites in the township. Some residents of other communities where turbines have already been built have said “they wish they would have gotten a head start, like we have,” Burke said.

“We’re feeling pretty good there’s a chance industrial wind turbines will not be in Enniskillen.” Core members will be handing out pamphlets and information at Saturday’s town-wide yard sale in Petrolia, and will have an information table May 1 at the Heidi’s Independent grocery store there. That will be followed by a community awareness meeting CORE has organized for May 2, 7 p.m., at Lambton Centennial School.

Lawyer Wallace Lang is scheduled to speak that evening about land leases and Greg Cameron will speak about insurance issues. Tammy Van Troost, president of the Lambton local of the National Farmers Union, is also expected to speak. Read article

Wind foes welcome ruling

CHATHAM KENT ONTARIO ENBRIDGE WIND FROM HWY3 TALBOT TRAIL11Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer
Wind turbine opponents in Lambton County are celebrating a silver lining they see in a court ruling that dismissed a claim against a wind project near Collingwood. The Ontario Superior Court of Justice this week dismissed a claim made by neighbouring property owners against the eight-turbine Fairview wind project WPD Canada is seeking provincial approval to build near the Clearview Township community of Stayner. The decision was based on the fact approval hasn’t been given yet.

But Eric Gillespie, a lawyer representing neighbours who brought the court action, says the ruling recognizes that claims against wind projects are possible as soon as projects receive approval. “There are many people who have been waiting to see how the courts would respond to these types of claims,” Gillespie said. “It now seems clear that as soon as a project is approved residents can start a claim.” Gillespie said that appears to be a major step forward for people concerned about industrial wind projects. “We can definitely expect more claims now that this door has been opened.”

Gillespie is currently also defending Plympton-Wyoming’s wind turbine bylaws against a legal challenge by the Suncor Energy, the company seeking provincial approval to build up to 62-turbines as part of its Cedar Point wind project in Lambton County. Wind opponents are also celebrating that the court accepted evidence indicating turbines could devalue neighbouring properties by 22% to 50% or more, and also impact the health of neighbours. Read article

Enniskillen says its an “unwilling host” to turbines

enniskillin-wind Marriott PhairSarnia Lambton Independent
Enniskillen Township council says it can’t be clearer about its opposition to wind turbines in the community declaring itself an “unwilling host.” Concerns have risen in the municipality in the past two months as three wind energy companies go door-to-door in the municipality, trying to find landowners willing to have industrial wind turbines on their property. The three companies could plant as many as 51 turbines in the countryside around Petrolia.

A community group, CORE – Conservation of Rural Enniskillen, has been formed and has been pressing council to take a stand against the project.

Mayor Kevin Marriott says council has been opposed to the projects but recently took the added step of passing a motion declaring itself to be an unwilling host to the wind energy centers. “I heard this was happening in a few municipalities across the province,” Marriott says, adding council unanimously supported the move.

The motion pleased CORE spokesman Chad Burke. “I believe that our mayor, our council, is doing everything they can do to keep industrial wind turbines out of our township,” Burke says in an email. Read article

Enniskillen wind turbine community awareness events

enniskillen CORECORE Meeting Flyer
Date: June 22
Time: 1:00-4:30pm
Place: Lambton Centennial – 3823 Oil Heritage Rd., Petrolia MAP

Beef on a Bun Lunch :1:00pm – 2:00pm

Speakers: 2:00 – 4:30 pm
Eric Gillespie – Environmental Lawyer
Ron Hartlen – Audible and infrasound and power demand
Barbara Ashbee-Lormand – Personal Experience with IWT’s

NextEra Varna (Bluewater) Wind Project approved by MOE – 40 more turbines

approved-transEnvironmental Registry
A Renewable Energy Approval (REA) has been issued to Varna Wind Inc. to engage in a renewable energy project in respect of a Class 4 wind facility consisting of the construction, installation, operation, use and retiring of up to 40 turbines, rated at 1.6 MW generating output capacity, with a total name plate capacity of 60 MW. The wind facility will be connected to Hydro One’s distribution system.

This Class 4 wind facility, known as the Bluewater Wind Energy Centre, consists of areas required for the wind facility components, as well as for the interconnection route. The wind facility is generally bounded Blackbush/Bronson Line to the west, Mill Road to the north, Concession 5 Road to the east, and Danceland Road/Staffa Road to the south. The interconnection route is generally bounded by Concession 5 Road to the west, Mill Road to the north, Huron Road and Perth 183 Road to the east, and Staffa Road to the south. Read the rest of this entry

Bluewater taken to court over wind turbine building fees

DSCF4225By Mac Christie, Times-Advocate Staff
VARNA – Bluewater’s high-priced wind turbine building permit fees are being challenged in court. The municipality’s building permit bylaw would see wind developers pay $434,000 per turbine for any wind turbine development in the municipality.

NextEra Energy’s Nicole Geneau confirmed the company – which plans to build two wind farms and a total of 52 turbines in Bluewater – has filed suit in Ontario Superior Court in London. “We’ve always maintained that we contested the bylaw that they passed,” Geneau said. “The reasons that we contested it, we stated at council several times. “It’s on that basis that we have moved to have the bylaw quashed and we’re going to continue to pursue that action.”

NextEra undertook the action with Northland Power, the developers of the Grand Bend Wind Farm, an installation which could see as many as 40 turbines erected in Bluewater. NextEra’s legal counsel Tyson Dyck had previously appeared at Bluewater council March 4, telling council the company disputed the bylaw as they feel it encroaches on several areas of the provincial jurisdiction, such as the Green Energy Act, as well as the Building Code Act.

The bylaw would see industrial wind turbine developers pay a $14,000 base permit fee, a $220,000 security per turbine for decommissioning, a $100,000 fee per turbine for matters related to health and property devaluation and a $100,000 fee per turbine for potential legal matters arising as a result of the turbines. Read article

Ontario court allows lawsuits against wind company and landowners … just a matter of time

211586-a-house-for-sale-hasreduced-price-signCunningham & Gillespie LLP,  Canada Newswire

Court Accepts 22% to 50% Loss of Property Values is Occurring Today; Court and Wind Company also Acknowledge Health and Noise Issues in Context of Motion

TORONTO, April 23, 2013 /CNW/ – In a decision released late yesterday, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has determined that while residents of Clearview Township cannot bring claims for a proposed industrial wind project at this time, the ruling is “without prejudice to the plaintiffs’ rights to commence an action for identical or similar relief when and if the Fairview Wind Project receives the necessary approvals to be constructed.” [Para. 6]

The court has specifically recognized that claims against wind companies and against landowners who agree to host wind turbines are possible as soon as projects receive approval. [Para. 37] “There are many people who have been waiting to see how the courts would respond to these types of claims” said lawyer Eric Gillespie, whose firm acts for the plaintiffs in the actions. “It now seems clear that as soon as a project is approved residents can start a claim. This appears to be a major step forward for people with concerns about industrial wind projects across Ontario.”

In addition, Gillespie’s firm acts for other clients in areas where wind projects have been approved. “Dozens of plaintiffs who have already started actions appear to have had the right to bring claims validated” he said. “We can definitely expect more claims now that this door has been opened.” Read article

Plympton-Wyoming eyes changes to turbine bylaw; meets with Suncor

courtSarnia Lambton This Week
PLYMPTON-WYOMING – The lawyer representing Plympton-Wyoming in its court battle against Suncor’s wind project says the municipality may clarify its bylaw after a recent court decision. This, while the municipality and Suncor meet to try to resolve some of their differences about the Cedar Point Wind Energy Center. Suncor has a plan to build a 100 megawatt project with up to 46 turbines in Plympton-Wyoming and Lambton Shores. Suncor is following the rules set out by the Green Energy Act, including keeping the giant turbines 550 meters from the nearest homes.

But Plympton-Wyoming Council was concerned about that distance saying there are reports of people becoming ill from the sounds and shadow flicker so close to the turbines. It passed its own bylaw under the Municipal Act to have the turbines two kilometers away from homes. Mayor Lonny Napper says the bylaw was passed to protect residents’ health – which is a duty of politicians under the act.

When the province passed the Green Energy Act, it over-ruled every other type of legislation including local municipalities planning authority, but Napper and other municipal politicians believe the Municipal Act doesn’t fall under the Green Energy Act. Suncor disagrees and is taking Plympton-Wyoming to court to challenge the two kilometer limit and two other bylaws which impose high fees for development and a $200,000 deposit per turbine to deal with the cost of removing the towers in the future. Read article

Plympton-Wyoming looks for guidance from Wainfleet decision

Wainfleet Rally 2 (1)By Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer
A court ruling that went against another municipality’s wind turbine setback bylaw could end up helping Plympton-Wyoming, says its lawyer. Suncor Energy has taken Plympton-Wyoming to court over wind turbine provisions in its bylaws, including a two-kilometre setback like the one in the Niagara-area municipality of Wainfleet Township an Ontario court recently said was invalid.

“The decision gives some guidance that wasn’t available previously,” said lawyer Eric Gillespie. He was hired by Plympton-Wyoming to help it defend its bylaws against Suncor’s challenge. Gillespie said the judge in the Wainfleet case said municipalities have the ability to pass bylaws concerning industrial wind projects, so long as they don’t conflict with the province’s legislation.

“The decision also provides direction regarding the way that some of the provisions of a bylaw should be put together,” Gillespie said. “Both of those elements will likely assist Plympton-Wyoming as we move forward for with its bylaw.” Read article

Township council motion calls Enniskillen an unwilling host

CHTHAM KENT ONTARIO  BORALEX FRONT LINE WIND FROM HWY3 TABLOT TRAILBy Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer
Enniskillen Township has joined a growing number of Ontario municipalities declaring that industrial wind farms aren’t welcome within their boundaries. Mayor Kevin Marriott said his council passed a motion this week calling itself an unwilling host, and he was at Queen’s Park in Toronto Thursday when Liberal and New Democrat MPPs defeated a Tory bill — 40 votes to 33 — that would have, among other measures, returned some local municipal control over wind projects.

Several wind companies have been active in Enniskillen Township, looking for land to lease for turbine projects, and a citizens’ group has formed there to oppose them. At a press conference in Toronto before Thursday’s vote Marriott spoke about the division that wind turbines create in rural municipalities like his. “The Green Energy Act has been nothing short of a nightmare for our community,” he said of the provincial legislation that took away local municipal planning control over renewable energy projects.

“We feel like our democracy has been stripped away.” Read article

Liberals, NDP ignore wind turbine concerns

QP

Petrolia Topic
A local contingent of municipal leaders and residents of Sarnia-Lambton watched at Queen’s Park in Toronto on April 18 as Liberal and NDP members of the Ontario legislature voted to continue the march of industrial wind turbines across rural Ontario. The Ensuring Affordable Energy Act, a bill presented by Ontario PC MPP Lisa Thompson, was debated in the legislature before the Liberal and NDP members teamed up to kill the act and its central purpose of returning decision making authority for industrial wind turbine developments to local municipalities.

The Act was drafted in response to a groundswell of criticism the Liberal and NDP parties have received since they passed and implemented the Green Energy Act (GEA) in 2009. Several municipal leaders, including Enniskillen Township Mayor Kevin Marriott, joined in a full day of efforts to persuade members of the Liberals and NDP to amend the controversial GEA by voting in support of the solutions presented in Thompson’s bill. Read article

NextEra Energy uses over 800 metric tons of concrete per wind turbine

cementDaily Commercial News
Ontario’s concrete industry has been enjoying the benefits of the province’s efforts to construct more wind energy and turbines. Concrete has been the material of choice to use as the foundation for wind towers, according the NextEra Energy, one of the largest wind and solar energy developers in North America.

“Given its durability, resilience and continuously improving environmental footprint, concrete can play an important role in building sustainable infrastructure,” said the Cement Association of Canada in a statement to the Daily Commercial News. “Enabling the deployment of sustainable energy by providing an important building material for wind turbines is one exciting example. Concrete also provides added economic benefits to communities where these turbines are built since concrete is always produced locally.”

NextEra Energy uses over 800 metric tons of concrete for each turbine they construct, with investments worth $1.7 billion and 8 wind projects in Ontario, also adding more jobs in the concrete industry. Read article

Mayor still confident in wind turbine stance

plympton wyomingPaul  Morden, Sarnia Observer
Plympton-Wyoming officials plan to consult with their lawyer over a recent court ruling that went against another Ontario municipality’s two-kilometre setback for wind turbines. Plympton-Wyoming is being sued by Suncor Energy over wind turbine provisions in its bylaws, including one that also calls for a two-kilometre setback.

The province only requires wind turbines be built at least 550-metres away from neighbouring properties and its Green Energy Act took planning approval powers for renewable energy projects away from municipalities. A Superior Court of Ontario judge ruled Friday the setback bylaw in the Niagara-area municipality of Wainfleet Township is invalid.

“We’ll be meeting, sooner than later, with our legal team and get some advice as to where we should go from here,” said Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper. “I don’t think it would change our stance any.

“I think we felt very confident with the way we presented our bylaws.” Suncor plans to build as many as 62 wind turbines in Plympton-Wyoming, Lambton Shores and Warwick Township as part of its Cedar Point Wind Power project. Read article

Enniskillen mayor skeptical of openness on Green Energy Act

Kevin MarriottManitoulin Expositor
During the Ontario Liberal leadership campaign, Kathleen Wynne promised to give municipalities across Ontario more say when it comes to wind farms, after the Green Energy Act of 2009 took that power completely away. To date my correspondence with the new premier leads me to believe that she is not planning to live up to that promise. It would seem that the common trend of making promises during campaigns and then reneging on those promises once in power is happening yet again.

On March 26 Lisa Thompson MPP (Huron-Bruce) introduced a private member’s bill called “Ensuring Affordable Energy Act” which would give municipalities like ours, and many others, democracy back where it belongs. The residents of many communities have been torn apart by whether or not to build wind turbines in their neighbourhoods. Whether or not you believe that wind turbines are the right answer to Ontario’s future energy needs, there are communities that are willing hosts and there are communities who are not.

There is much anticipation that on April 18, 2013, both Liberal and NDP members will support a return to democracy in Ontario’s rural areas by supporting this bill. With the political climate at Queen’s Park if these two parties do not support this bill, then a spring election would be more than welcome. This is not a bill that concerns whether or not Ontario should support green energy; it’s about having something very important and fundamental to Canadians restored and maintained, namely democracy.

I strongly suggest everyone to contact their MPP and ask them to support this very important piece of legislation.

Kevin Marriott
Mayor Township of Enniskillen

Bluewater asks County Health Unit for health study on wind turbines

Health Studies BEFORE Wind TurbinesLakeshore Advance
At Bluewater’s April 2 meeting, councillors passed a motion to ask the Huron County Health Unit to undertake an independent health study on industrial wind turbines. In a phone interview last week, Councillor John Gillespie said the request would take the form of a letter to the Health Unit, which will be made public after municipal staff draft it.

“We’ll wait and see what comes from the Health Unit,” he said adding, the organization’s mandate says it will investigate concerns of the community through research studies, but ultimately it will be up to the organization to decide if it is something they can do. “It was an idea I had in relation to the role of what the Health Unit might be able to do in relation to industrial wind turbines,” explained Gillespie. “With the mounting evidence locally and in southwestern Ontario with residents living close to wind turbines having issues like sleep deprivation because of low frequency noise and shadow flicker, I thought it would be good to examine the issue on a broader scale,” he said.

Bluewater has three wind turbine developments proposed for the municipality, which are at various stages in the Ministry of the Environment’s renewable energy approval process. “It was appropriate to ask under the circumstances,” he added. Read article

C-K residents living in shadow of industrial wind turbines resort to drastic measures

LibbyChatham Daily News
David Libby has lived on Golf Course Line outside Ridgetown for nearly 20 years. He built his brick home with ceramic tiled floors in the kitchen and dining room. A decision, all these years later, that is helping him sleep in his basement at night.

In December 2010, two industrial wind turbines began operating a few hundred metres to the south of his property. The noise coming from their direction was waking him up at night. “I tried six different kinds of insulation to block out the noise through my bedroom windows,” said Libby. Sheets of one-inch Styrofoam and thick corrugated cardboard still cover his upstairs bedroom windows. “It helped,” he said. But, he says he gets his best sleep now in the basement. “I’m lucky I have nearly an inch of cement in my floors to help deaden the sound,” he said.

A neighbour isn’t as fortunate. Mike, who asked his last name not be published, has lived on Shewburg Line for over 20 years. “I would lie there wide awake (at night in bed),” said Mike. He too has moved a mattress into his unfinished basement to try to get a better night’s sleep. But rest still doesn’t come easy without sleeping pills, said Mike. Read article

Suncor Adelaide project up for 45 day comment period

CommentEnvironmental Registry DUE MAY 30, 2013
Description of Instrument:
This posting is for a proposed Renewable Energy Approval by Suncor Energy Products Inc., for the Suncor Energy Adelaide Wind Power Project, proposed to be located in the Township of Adelaide Metcalfe, County of Middlesex, Ontario. This is a Class 4 wind facility with a total expected generation capacity of 40 megawatts (MW).

The proposed facility is considered to be a Class 4 wind facility under Ontario Regulation 359/09 (O. Reg.359/09) Renewable Energy Approvals under Part V.0.1 of the Environmental Protection Act. Applications for Renewable Energy Approvals are required to be submitted in accordance with O.Reg.359/09 for consideration for approval.

Other Information:
This comment period is for the public to review the proposal and provide comments and input directly to the ministry.

Public Consultation:
This proposal has been posted for a 45 day public review and comment period starting April 15, 2013. If you have any questions, or would like to submit your comments, please do so by May 30, 2013 to the individual listed under “Contact”. Additionally, you may submit your comments on-line.

All comments received prior to May 30, 2013 will be considered as part of the decision-making process by the Ministry of the Environment if they are submitted in writing or electronically using the form provided in this notice and reference EBR Registry number 011-8848.

Please Note: All comments and submissions received will become part of the public record. You will not receive a formal response to your comment, however, relevant comments received as part of the public participation process for this proposal will be considered by the decision maker for this proposal.

MPP McNaughton Pushes For Reply To Unanswered Wind Letters

EnergyMinLettersApril 15, 2013
PC MPP Delivered Hundreds of Unanswered Letters to Minister of Energy Today.
(Queen’s Park, ON) – 
Lambton-Kent-Middlesex PC MPP Monte McNaughton is pressing new Liberal Minister of Energy Bob Chiarelli to respond to hundreds of unanswered letters and emails from constituents and residents across Ontario. McNaughton delivered the file of unanswered letters to Chiarelli in the house this morning.

“Coming from a family business and one where customer service is paramount, I find this to be completely and totally unacceptable,” said MPP McNaughton. “Our constituents deserve answers, especially when they have taken the time to write and express their concerns or ask important questions. For a minister of the crown to simply choose to ignore these letters is not acceptable and is not right.”

The letters raise important questions and concerns about the Liberal efforts to encourage further development of industrial wind turbines. MPP McNaughton and the Ontario PCs continue to push for changes to the Liberals failed green energy act and costly FIT program. McNaughton will support MPP Lisa Thompson’s Bill 39 the ‘Ensuring Affordable Energy Act, 2013’ when it comes to a vote on April 18.

“Tim Hudak and the Ontario PCs are the only party fighting to halt further wind turbine development,” said McNaughton. “I have heard from thousands of people from across Lambton-Kent-Middlesex and they have told me loud and clear that they would like a pause, a moment to stop and consider these developments prior to more shovels breaking ground.”

As outlined in the Ontario PC policy white paper Paths to Prosperity: Affordable Energy, McNaughton and the PCs propose winding down the provinces Feed-in-Tariff Program (FIT), immediately halting all new projects still in the approval queue and stop contracting for power we don’t need, at prices Ontario residents cannot afford

Monte’s letter to the Minister of Energy regarding unanswered mail

NextEra’s Next Nest – near Parkhill

I spy with my little eye something that will NEVER AGAIN be removed by a wind developer in Ontario. An eagle nest. Over my dead body, NexTerror.

When the community labels Nextera “NexTerror” and “NextError”, it isn’t for just any old reason. Perhaps parody is ingrained in Canadians, and this is why Nextera has earned itself yet another new name: NESTerror. We watched the take down of the eagle’s nest in Haldimand, and literally vowed never again.

choppedSo this weekend some pictures of two bald eaglea and their nest were sent to me by a local resident. This nest is in the Nextera Bornish Wind Project (@ Kerwood Rd & Elginfield Rd), close to wind turbines (634m), and very close (187m) to the massive switchyard for the Bornish, Adelaide, Jericho and Cedar Point Wind Projects— a total of 221 turbines for Middlesex and Lambton counties. The Bornish and Adelaide projects are scheduled to be approved by the MOE this month.

The Haldimand nest destruction was not a ‘one-off’, I’m sure of that, even though Nextera rep Tom Bird told us, “I absolutely don’t want to do that again.” Not even a month after they took down the nest in Haldimand county, they were eying up one in Middlesex county.

Looking through Nextera’s website I came across these recent addendums from February, 2013:

Read the rest of this entry

Activist says she won’t cease and desist

we will not be silentBy Paul Morden, London Free Press
Middlesex County anti-wind turbine activist Esther Wrightman says she’s not giving in to a cease and desist warning from lawyers working for NextEra Energy Canada. A letter, dated March 20, was sent to Wrightman calling on her to remove YouTube videos and wind resistance website postings because of company logos altered to read “NEXTerror” and “Nextterror Bullies Canada Inc.”

“Our request is simply to not use the corporation’s registered, trademarked logo in a manner that is defamatory,” NextEra spokesperson Josie Hernandez said in an email. Hernandez said company officials attempted to contact Wrightman personally to resolve the issue before the letter from the lawyers was sent. Wrightman said phone calls where made to her home but she never spoke directly to those company representatives. “We aren’t trying to limit debate, which is clear from our letter, but we have rights in our logo that are entitled to protection under the law,” Hernandez said.

The letter from the lawyers to Wrightman mention in particular use of “NEXTerror” in a video shot in January as crews destroyed a bald eagle nest on the site of NextEra’s Summerhaven wind project in Haldimand. The tree holding the nest came down with the permission of Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources. The letter from the lawyers asks Wrightman to remove that video – as well as a second one interviewing company officials about the nest – from YouTube by March 22. Read article

Anti-wind activist “won’t back down” as NextEra threatens legal action

IM000872.JPGHeather Wright, Sarnia Lambton Independent
Esther Wrightman says she’s not about to be silenced in her fight against wind turbines in her community. Wrightman, a member of Middlesex Lambton Wind Action Group, recently received a Cease and Desist order from NextEra Energy after altering the company’s logo to make it read Next-terror and NextError on signs and videos.

“This use of the NextEra logo is unsanctioned, in violation of NextEra’s intellectual property rights and defamatory, especially in conjunction with the video makers’ disparaging comments about NextEra,” Awanish Sinha of McCarthy Tetrault law firm in Toronto writes to Wrightman. “While NextEra recognizes your right to object to its projects and to express your opinions regarding wind power and provincial policies regarding green energy, you do not have a right to utilize its name and logo in any manner or to defame the company.” Sinha writes company officials tried a half dozen times to talk to the activist by phone about their concerns, but weren’t able to reach her. When Wrightman added NextTerror Bullies Canada Inc. to a blog, Sinha says the company felt it had to take legal action. “The latest manipulation of NextEra’s logo has compelled NextEra to take this action and stop this escalating abuse.”

dsc03328The company told Wrightman to remove all uses of the alter logos on the Middlesex Lambton Wind Action Group and Ontario Wind Resistance blogs. It also calls for two videos – one of company workers removing a bald eagle’s nest which was in the way of a new project in Haldimand County. Wrightman says that video and another of a company official telling protestors the Ministry of the Environment gave permission for the nest to be cut, have been viewed thousands of times and have shocked people. “I really believe it has more to do with them wanting the eagle nest video down,” she says. Wrightman believes the letter is simply a threat that the company uses with people who don’t agree with their projects. Read article

Bill 39: Ensuring Affordable Energy Act on April 18th

lisa-thompsonDate: April 18
Time: 3:30pm-3:45pm
Place: Queen’s Park, Toronto

Hello:
I am writing to you today to inform you that I will be debating Bill 39, the Ensuring Affordable Energy Act on April 18th.

This bill contains six key pillars:

  • Wind turbines will only be placed in willing host communities, and municipalities will be given full veto over wind turbine projects in their communities;
  • Wind power must be affordable—meaning the cost per kilowatt hour must line up with other sources of generation;
  • The costly feed-in tariff (FIT) program will be eliminated;
  • Municipalities will have the ability to decide whether or not they want to promote wind energy;
  • The Niagara Escarpment and the Oak Ridges Moraine will be protected from wind turbines; and
  • Municipalities will receive their planning powers for renewable energy back

I know that issues with wind turbines are important to you. This is why I am inviting you to join myself, and the PC’s for second reading debate on this important piece of legislation. It is estimated that debate would begin on this bill at approximately 3:30-3:45.

If you would like to attend second reading debate, please RSVP directly to Ashley Hammill in my office at ashley.hammill@pc.ola.org. RSVP’s are necessary as security needs to have the names forwarded to them prior to your arrival.

The Ontario PC Party and I appreciate your ongoing support, and we will work hard to ensure this bill is passed.

Regards,
Lisa Thompson, MPP

Enniskillen will wait to impose a two km zone for wind turbines

enniskillen-windHeather Wright, Sarnia Lambton Independent
Enniskillen Township politicians say they’re considering a bylaw to keep wind turbines two kilometers from homes. But Mayor Kevin Marriott says council is waiting to see what happens with two prominent cases in the Ontario courts before acting. There are three wind energy companies going door-to-door in the municipality trying to sign farmers to wind leases. The projects could mean up to 51 turbines in the community.

A new group, CORE – Conservation of Rural Enniskillen – has been formed to encourage residents not to sign on, making it difficult for the wind companies to get the land base they need. So far, the companies have not secured contracts with the provincial government to sell power.

That’s why Marriott and his council told members of CORE at a recent council meeting they’re taking their time on imposing a two kilometer limit – which would be directly opposed to provincial law. Marriott says communities such as Wainfleet and Plympton-Wyoming which imposed the limit are facing legal challenges and are currently in court. A decision on the Wainfleet two kilometer set back is expected in weeks.

“When we hear that decision we thought we’d be in a better position to proceed with setback (requirements) like Plympton-Wyoming’s,” says Marriott adding a larger exclusion zone would be one of the best ways to stop wind projects in the community. “Two kilometers would pretty well eliminate any place in rural Lambton,” says Marriott. Read article

Nextera, Suncor – Answers needed to questions about OUR schools & YOUR wind turbines

Dear Nextera, Suncor, Media and School Board trustees,

I am quite upset to see incorrect and confusing numbers reported in the media as to how many and how close wind turbines are to be from the schools in Lambton County. It is not the media’s fault.

Nextera, Suncor: I have reviewed wind project noise documents for 4 years – I should be competent in it by now. But I find I am tearing my hair out reviewing the documents, trying to find the exact noise, and distances turbines are to the schools in your projects.

Currently, my frustration stems from:

  1. The Bosanquet elementary school does not even have a Receptor ID on the project draft map.
  2. The hundreds of receptor ID’s are not numerically ordered in the noise chart – and I honestly can’t even find the school ID (or in this case, it’s neighbour’s, because it doesn’t have an ID).
  3. At the wind developer meetings, the schools are not even identified on the large maps. Security was called over when I wrote “school” on the map location for others to be able to see. How’s THAT for informing the public?? No wonder the media doesn’t know the true numbers… Read the rest of this entry

LKDSB sending letter to premier and other ministers

blenheim[Ed note: the school board plans to have a presentation and a workshop with Dr. David Colby – This UNACCEPTABLE.]
Chatham Daily News
The Lambton Kent District School Board plans to inform the Ontario government some industrial wind turbines are being constructed near two of its elementary schools in Lambton County. Trustee Jane Bryce was successful in having a majority of trustees accept her motion during Tuesday’s board meeting in Chatham that a letter be sent to Premier Kathleen Wynne, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care Deb Matthews and Minister of Education Liz Sandals. She wants the letter to make them aware that provincial government of approval has been granted for two wind projects being build near the two schools.

She said five turbines are approved to go up near Aberarder Central School between Camlachie and Forest and another four turbines are to be built near Bosanquet Central School in Lambton Shores. Bryce questioned if the LKDSB were looking for a site for a new school “we probably wouldn’t put in the middle of where industrial turbines are.” She said she just wants to make sure the premier and ministers are aware of this situation, considering the number of people who have been asking for a moratorium on the construction of industrial wind turbines over potential impacts on human health.

Bryce raised the issue, which was discussed during a delegation to the board of trustees at the March 26 meeting about NextEra Jericho Wind Project near Aberarder or Suncor’s Cedar Point Wind Power Project near Bosanquet. Read article