Category Archives: Property value

Ontario court allows lawsuits against wind company and landowners … just a matter of time

211586-a-house-for-sale-hasreduced-price-signCunningham & Gillespie LLP,  Canada Newswire

Court Accepts 22% to 50% Loss of Property Values is Occurring Today; Court and Wind Company also Acknowledge Health and Noise Issues in Context of Motion

TORONTO, April 23, 2013 /CNW/ – In a decision released late yesterday, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has determined that while residents of Clearview Township cannot bring claims for a proposed industrial wind project at this time, the ruling is “without prejudice to the plaintiffs’ rights to commence an action for identical or similar relief when and if the Fairview Wind Project receives the necessary approvals to be constructed.” [Para. 6]

The court has specifically recognized that claims against wind companies and against landowners who agree to host wind turbines are possible as soon as projects receive approval. [Para. 37] “There are many people who have been waiting to see how the courts would respond to these types of claims” said lawyer Eric Gillespie, whose firm acts for the plaintiffs in the actions. “It now seems clear that as soon as a project is approved residents can start a claim. This appears to be a major step forward for people with concerns about industrial wind projects across Ontario.”

In addition, Gillespie’s firm acts for other clients in areas where wind projects have been approved. “Dozens of plaintiffs who have already started actions appear to have had the right to bring claims validated” he said. “We can definitely expect more claims now that this door has been opened.” Read article

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Real Estate Assoc. presents Doug Pedlar with Volunteer Leader Award for wind turbine education

Doug_Pedlar_wins_OREA_Volunteer_Leader_AwardDoug has been a gem for MLWAG and other wind action groups in Ontario with his ever changing, updated presentation that he has taken across the province to just about anyone who asks! Congratulation Doug – you truly deserve it!

London St. Thomas Association of Realtors – March 13, 2013

The Board of Directors of LSTAR congratulates Doug Pedlar, its 2013 President, on having won the prestigious 2012 Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) Volunteer Leader Award. This award recognizes an individual who has played an important role or addressed a major issue or challenge facing his or her association over the past year.

“In our estimation, Doug’s ongoing efforts over the past year to educate Organized Real Estate, real estate associations and the public on the potential negative impacts of wind turbines on human and animal health and on property values made him an absolute stand-out for the OREA Volunteer of the Year Award,” says Barb Whitney, 2012 LSTAR President. “Not only did he thoroughly research the issue himself and put together his own presentation on the subject, he took that presentation across the province in 2012, speaking to a total of twenty different groups.” Read article

MPAC looking at effects of wind turbines on assessment

Aaron Van Ooteghen

Heather Wright, Sarnia-Lambton Independent
A  study which will show whether the value of the property around industrial wind turbines has changed is just about complete. Officials from the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation talked to Lambton County Councilors about how the wind energy projects are assessed for tax purposes and what affect they have on surrounding property owners.

Officials say privately owned turbines and those owned by non-profit organizations aren’t subject to taxes but industrial turbines in commercial projects are. A 1.5 megawatt turbine – typical of the industrial projects – is valued at $60,000.That fact didn’t sit well with county councilors. “How did someone come up with $40,000 on a structure that is worth $6 million,” says Brooke Alvinston Mayor Don McGugan.

St. Clair Township Mayor Steve Arnold says the artificially low assessment means lower tax revenue for the municipality estimating a turbine would generate $500 to $1,000 in taxes. “That’s not a lot of dollars for the local municipalities; that’s what has driven a lot of municipalities to put extra costs onto the projects.” Arnold says municipalities were led to believe it would up to $10,000 per turbine. “There is a lot of miscommunication.” Read article

MPAC waiting on turbine study

mpacSarnia Observer
[excerpt] Property owners living with wind turbines on or near their land are watching for new study results expected by the end of February. MPAC (Municipal Property Assessment Corporation), the agency that sets property values for tax purposes, has taken a second look at whether wind turbines impact assessment. A similar study carried out in 2008 concluded there was no impact.

However, the results could be different this time around because there have been more sales, more turbines and a larger area has been studied, said Tim Brown, MPAC’s manager of property values for special and institutional properties. He was a guest speaker at county council Wednesday and said assessed values are directly related to recent sale prices.

If the study concludes property values are impacted by wind turbines, MPAC will need to adjust assessments accordingly, Brown said. There are currently 36 wind farms in Ontario that range in size from one to 110 turbines. Read article

Bank considers property near wind turbine infrastructure “high risk”

 

Royal credit line declined letterRoyal line credit denied letter

NexTerror Wind and Rural Fear

DSCN6594by Harvey Wrightman
The Liberal party, engaged in a collective effort of navel-gazing, is puzzled as to why rural residents have such irrational fear of the great green future planned for them – all the prospective leadership candidates affirm that the wind energy program will proceed as planned.

One of the newest wrinkles to the wind program is now coming to light. The 300 or so wind turbines planned for north east Lambton, north west Middlesex and southern Huron Counties require transmission lines to get to Hydro’s 500kv main line some 40 km away. The wind companies, in their typical corporate arrogance, planned their projects first, leaving transmission details for later, never anticipating that things here would be any different than they are in Kansas or Missouri where you send out your “landmen” (that’s what this particular breed of slime is called) to offer a few dollars for the easements required – and the poles are up before anyone even knows about it. Almost everything on private land so there are no hassles with municipal or State bureaucrats. So, we can do the same thing here, right? – Well, not exactly. Read the rest of this entry

Nextera’s transmission troubles in Middlesex & Lambton

In Middlesex County, Nextera has two wind projects up for final public comment: Adelaide and Bornish, totaling 83 turbines, for now. The company’s plan is to connect these two projects, as well as the 92 turbine Nextera Jericho and 62 Suncor Cedar Point projects, with one massive transmission line. Problem is, the route isn’t figured out yet. Remember, the public is supposed to be filing their final comments right now on  complete project documents, and yet this very significant piece of information isn’t available for the public to comment on, or even view.

The map (above right) shows a ‘proposed’ route – this is all the public, the county, the townships and the Ministry of Environment are supposed to know right now. In fact, this route has not been secured. Landowners refused to sign easements; Hydro Ones said ‘no’ to sharing their poles. And now Nextera is planning to ask Middlesex County council to allow the company to erect their own 90’ poles with 115kv lines on the other side of the county’s road; hoping that council will ignore the significant safety risk that this will pose to regular travelers by doubling the number of hydro poles on county road allowance.

But this isn’t the whole story. Nextera has a plan “C”, lovingly called the “Back Country” route. The locals started cluing into this plan when residents were being approached by CanAcre landmen to sign 100′ transmission easements through the back of their lots— in some cases through mature, hard maple bush. At the final public meeting when company representatives were asked about this route, they twisted away from saying it was so, until they were certain that we were not going to tolerate being lied to. One rep was asked: if they were to use this route, would they not have to have another public meeting to unveil this new plan? Yes, he said they would. But no new meeting has taken place, so we just assumed they were using one of the other routes….until we saw these documents at the MOE office in London (they were only placed on the company’s website 3 days ago, after complaints to the MOE were made). Take a look at pg.11 and on – these are personal notes that the CanAcre landmen took while trying to sign-up the ‘Back Country’ land. Why was this sent to the MOE? Do they intend to still use this route? It would appear that that would still be a big possibility as to this day, CanAcre is still making their rounds in the community, trying to get the land signed that they need.

What would this ‘Back Country’ route look like? Nextera of course does not have a map available, but residents were able to piece it together by basically following the plow lines in the fields and assembling the map below. The Red line is the “Back country” and the Yellow is the current Proposed Line. Be sure to follow those lines, right through the woodlot— and remember this is supposed to be ‘green energy’.

Does it not fly in the face of reason that council and the public are only now being shown all the various transmission routes that this company is contemplating? We are in the middle of the final 30 day comment periods for both the Bornish and Adelaide projects – this is the last time the Ministry of Environment allows us to comment on these projects. If the MOE has truly reviewed all of Nextera’s Bornish and Adelaide Project Documents, and deemed them complete so that we could review them – does it not seem like they may be missing a large piece of the puzzle, of WHERE the transmission lines are going? We know of three different transmission routes: on Hydro One’s poles, on the other side of the county road, and the ‘back country route’ – all of which are still being actively pursued by the wind company. We are being asked to comment on incomplete and unavailable information… or perhaps they do not wish to have the public’s comments and that is why we are left out of the decision making.

Nextera approaching Middlesex County Council for road allowance- 115kv Transmission Lines

Date: November 27
Time: 1:00 pm
Place: Middlesex County Building, 399 Ridout St. North, London MAP

Nextera Letter to Middlesex County Council

Nextera is seeking use of Middlesex County’s road allowance for their own personal 115kv transmission line to connec the Adelaide, Jericho and Bornish wind projects, or so they think for now. You see, they have several plans inplay, and even though the wind projects are in their final days of public comment period, the wind company still does not have a transmission route figured out. They seem to be under the illusion that we don’t need/want to comment on this as well?

This proposal to county council asks that we allow the double lining our roads with hydro poles, doubling the safety risk for road traffic. They will be 90′ poles, erected in front of residents homes and farms. For who? For a company from Florida. Be there to say NO!

Council seeks answers on turbine impact

Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer

Municipal councillors in Plympton-Wyoming want to know what wind turbines heading their way will do to property values.

Council passed a resolution recently asking the Ontario government for information about the impact wind energy projects are having on property value assessments.

“There have been all kinds of rumours out there and we’ve been trying to get the information from MPAC (Municipal Property Assessment Corporation) or municipal affairs about the severity of it,” said Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper.

“We’re just looking for some answers” and haven’t received any so far from MPAC, he said.

“Council put together a motion that we put a little heat on them.”

The municipality is expected to be home to several of the up to 62 wind turbines Suncor plans to build as part of its Cedar Point wind project.

Napper said residents have been telling council they’re worried about their property values. He added councillors are also concerned because those values determine property assessments, and that impacts the tax dollars available to maintain roads and other services.

“If we’re going to have our tax base eroded, we’ve got to make some other changes,” Napper said. Read the rest of this entry

Former Liberal MP Crawford joins call for wind turbine moratorium

Chatham Daily News
A well-known Dover farmer-politician claims the proliferation of industrial wind turbines in his area has cost him the potential sale of his home.

Rex Crawford, former Dover reeve and Liberal MP, added his voice Thursday to a growing chorus of politicians and citizens demanding a moratorium on wind turbine construction.

Crawford, along with Lambton-Kent-Middlesex MP Bev Shipley and Lambton-Kent-Middlesex MPP Monte McNaughton, called for the moratorium while standing at the site of a yet-to-be constructed turbine less than 1,500 feet from Crawford’s home on Bear Line Road.

Crawford said the province is breaking all the rules that Dover had in place while he was reeve to protect farmland.

“We have some of the best farmland in Canada in Dover and it’s being taken over by wind turbines,” he said. “More than 55 turbines are being built in this area alone.”

Crawford said a potential Toronto buyer for his property withdrew his interest once he learned a wind turbine was being constructed within a stone’s throw from the property. Read article

Anti-wind lawsuits stacking up in Ontario

by John Spears, The Star
Another group of Ontario landowners has filed a lawsuit against a wind power project in the escalating legal skirmishing over renewable energy. The latest action – against the East Lake St. Clair wind project near Wallaceburg – is the 10th that his firm is working on, according to lawyer Eric Gillespie, who filed the claim.

Like several previous actions by residents living near wind developments, the suit claims damages from not just the wind developer, International Power Canada. It also seeks damages from seven landowners who have leased out their property for turbines.

Gillespie said his clients are seeking a total of $9 million. “The claim is based on alleged devaluation of property,” Gillespie said in an interview. The claimants are asking to be compensated for up to the full value of their properties, he said.

Gilllespie said some studies have shown that property near wind power developments declines in value by up to 40 per cent. But he said some landowners near wind projects have found no buyers at all when they try to sell, which is why his clients are asking for the full value of their holdings in compensation. The East Lake St. Clair project is designed to deliver 99 megawatts of power, using about 55 turbines. Read article

Ontario wind war widens

By Jonathan Sher, John Miner, The London Free Press
Lawsuits are the new front in the fight to stop wind turbines

The war over Ontario wind turbines is shifting to the courts, with property values brandished as the main weapon by opponents of the multi-billion-dollar provincial push to develop wind farms.

Toronto lawyer Eric Gillespie said he has lawsuits in the works from 10 different parts of Ontario and is in talks with at least three other groups in its southwest.

“That number is growing quite rapidly,” Gillespie said Thursday.

“Currently, we have either filed claims or are about to file claims that go all the way from Windsor to Ottawa.”

Lawsuits have already been launched in Chatham-Kent, LaSalle, Prince Edward County, Clearview/Creemore and the Stayner area.

Another lawsuit is in the works involving wind turbines in the Port Dover area.

“Property devaluation is clearly becoming a major concern right across Ontario,” said Gillespie.

The shift to fighting in the courts follows a failed campaign by anti-wind forces in last year’s Ontario’s election — the McGuinty Liberals eked out a minority government, despite losing rural seats where opposition is strongest — to stop wind-turbine development.

Southwestern Ontario, home to Ontario’s largest wind projects, is one of the key battlegrounds. Read the rest of this entry

Lansink’s 2nd Property Diminution in Price Study: Clear Creek, ON

Case Studies Clear Creek Melancthon Wind Turbines Oct-12
CONCLUSIONS – Current Values, Property Purchases and Re-Sales Market evidence suggests that ‘dwelling properties’ will be harmed or injured by the construction, use, and maintenance of wind turbines situated in the vicinity. Real or perceived nuisances resulting from wind turbines produces buyer resistance that results in price diminution.
Conclusion: Clear Creek, known as Frogmore-Cultus-Clear Creek, about 18 Wind Turbines

  1. 1480 Lakeshore Road, Norfolk           -44.17%
  2. 71 Norfolk County Road 23, Norfolk  -55.18%
  3. 47 Concession Road A, Norfolk         -22.47%
  4. 43 Old Mill Road, Norfolk                  -32.96%
  5. 1575 Lakeshore Road, Norfolk          -27.67%
  6. 1527 Lakeshore Road, Norfolk          -28.88%
  7. 1921 Lakeshore Road, Norfolk          -38.48%

Median -32.96%
Average -35.69%
Low -22.47%
High -55.18%

None of the above properties had a Wind Turbine situated on its land.

The Wind Turbines were located in the neighbourhood. However, it is reasonable to assume that a property that has a wind turbine erected on it will suffer a similar price diminution and will also be injuriously affected. The Future: Given that wind turbines are a relatively new phenomenon in Ontario (since 2005), it may be that in the future a buyer will simply refuse to purchase a property within the
vicinity of a wind turbine. If there is no buyer, there may be no value.

Gone with the wind

By John Miner, The London Free Press
Homeowners close to wind turbines can expect to see much of their property values blown away, a provocative study by a London property appraiser has found. Sellers in the future could even find their properties are worth nothing, says the study by Ben Lansink of Lansink Appraisals and Consulting.

“If there is no buyer, there may be no value,” Lansink concluded. Industrial wind turbines have become a huge sore point for many in Ontario, with about 1,200 of the often-unwanted behemoths now in operation now and with the province having signed deals that will more than double that number in the next couple of years.

Lansink, who’s been qualified as a real estate expert in court proceedings, analyzed properties in the Shelburne area, north of Orangeville, home to Ontario’s first major industrial wind farm — the 133-turbine Melancthon Wind Facility.

He found five homes that had been bought by the wind farm developer, Canadian Hydro Developments, a subsidiary of Calgary-based TransAlta, at fair market value. Canadian Hydro later put those houses back on the market and they sold for an average loss of 38%. One brought 58.5% less.

“The erection of a wind turbine creates apprehension in the general public, which makes property less desirable and thus diminishes the prices of neighbouring property,” Lansink said. Read the rest of this entry

Gone with the wind

By John Miner, The London Free Press
Homeowners close to wind turbines can expect to see much of their property values blown away, a provocative study by a London property appraiser has found. Sellers in the future could even find their properties are worth nothing, says the study by Ben Lansink of Lansink Appraisals and Consulting.

“If there is no buyer, there may be no value,” Lansink concluded. Industrial wind turbines have become a huge sore point for many in Ontario, with about 1,200 of the often-unwanted behemoths now in operation now and with the province having signed deals that will more than double that number in the next couple of years.

Lansink, who’s been qualified as a real estate expert in court proceedings, analyzed properties in the Shelburne area, north of Orangeville, home to Ontario’s first major industrial wind farm — the 133-turbine Melancthon Wind Facility.

He found five homes that had been bought by the wind farm developer, Canadian Hydro Developments, a subsidiary of Calgary-based TransAlta, at fair market value. Canadian Hydro later put those houses back on the market and they sold for an average loss of 38%. One brought 58.5% less.

“The erection of a wind turbine creates apprehension in the general public, which makes property less desirable and thus diminishes the prices of neighbouring property,” Lansink said. Read article

New Ontario Wind Turbine Property Value Analysis – Ben Lansink AACI, P. App, MRCS

CASE STUDY Diminution in Value Wind Turbine Analysis
Case Study Wind Turbines Diminution Injurious Affection Oct-12

Lansink Appraisals and Consulting–
by Ben Lansink AACI, P. App, MRCS

Conclusion – Property Purchases and Re-Sales
Market evidence suggests that ‘dwelling properties’ will be harmed or injured by the construction, use, and maintenance of wind turbines situated on properties located in the vicinity. Real or perceived nuisances resulting from wind turbines produces buyer resistance that results in price diminution.

Conclusion: Price diminution due to the Melancthon Wind Facility: 133 wind turbines

1 ID 15797 – 375557 6th Line, Amaranth -48.27%
2 ID 15798 – 97121 4th Line, Melancthon -58.56%
3 ID 15799 – 504059 Highway 89, Melancthon -23.24%
4 ID 15800 – 582340 County Road 17, Melancthon -26.66%
5 ID 16339 – 582328 County Road 17, Melancthon -37.30%

Median Loss in Market Price -37.30%
Average Loss in Market Price -38.81%

The erection of a wind turbine creates apprehension in the general public, which makes the property less desirable and thus diminishes the prices of neighbouring property. Continuing scientific uncertainty over the adverse health consequences of wind turbines only serves to perpetuate the debilitating effect of wind turbines on property prices.

By including the Transfer of Easement in Gross in the deed/transfer of the properties sold by Canadian Hydro Developments, Inc., it is reasonable to conclude that Canadian Hydro Developers, Inc. was fully aware of problems associated with…heat, sound, vibration, shadow, flickering of light, noise (including grey noise) or any other adverse effect or combination thereof resulting directly or indirectly from the operation of the Transferee’s wind turbine facilities situated…within the Townships of Melancthon and Amaranth, in the County of Dufferin…’ and that the turbines …’may affect the living environment’…”.

The covenants imposed by Canadian Hydro Developments, Inc. and accepted by the five buyers suggest an official admission by Canadian Hydro Developments, Inc. that there are living environment issues with the result that there is a diminution in price as a result of wind turbines.

It is also reasonable to assume that a property that has a wind turbine erected on it will suffer a similar price diminution and will be injuriously affected.

The Future: Given that wind turbines are a relatively new phenomenon in Ontario (2005), it may be that in the future a buyer will simply refuse to purchase a property within the vicinity of a wind turbine. If there is no buyer, there may be no value. Read Full Report

Powerful ally: Wind opponents hail election of local activist as head of real estate board

Sarnia This Week
GRAND BEND – For months, Grand Bend Realtor Doug Pedlar has been voicing concerns about property values near industrial wind turbines. Now, he has a larger podium to speak from. Pedlar, who researched just how much homeowners lose when wind farms set up shop next door (about 30 per cent) is now the president-elect of the London/St. Thomas Real Estate Board. One of his first tasks was an eight-minute YouTube video about wind turbines and property values.

Pedlar says the London/ St Thomas board has been very worried about the issue, even pressing the provincial real estate association to speak to the province about the matter. “We’re quietly working away at this,” he says. But the volume is going up. The YouTube video had 500 hits in the first weekend and other real estate boards are posting the information session on their website. And Pedlar is pleased.

“The unfortunate thing about it is people are just not aware of what is going on,” he says. “If you don’t see them, if they’re not in your face, you don’t know. “The thing that I’m really afraid of is not just the property values but the perception of going to an area filled with turbines,” says Pedlar, fearing people will discount living in rural areas because of the turbines. “I drive through Chatham-Kent (the municipality with 300 turbines either built or on the books) and I get a sick feeling…it is not the most pleasant thing in the world.” Read the rest of this entry

Industrial Wind Turbines and Their Effect on Our Quality of Life

Industrial wind turbines are springing up all over Ontario and people living close to them are concerned about what impact they might have, both on their personal wellbeing and on the value and enjoyment of their property. So are Ontario’s REALTORS®. Listen to LSTAR’s President-Elect, Doug Pedlar, as he presents the case for a moratorium on wind turbines until all the facts are in.

Hello wind turbine – Goodbye insurance

Even the insurance brokers want nothing to do with wind turbines on your property!

Plympton-Wyoming residents say no to wind turbines

By John Phair, Today’s Farmer

In closing Vanhuisen had a warning for those in attendance. “Don’t come bitchin after the fact, get involved now,” she said.

Public resistance to industrial wind turbines appears to be gaining momentum across southwestern Ontario.

A crowd of about 600 packed the Camlachie Community Hall April 19 for a town hall meeting hosted by a newly formed citizen’s group known as W.A.I.T (We’re Against Industrial Turbines).

The group has been formed to oppose an 83-turbine wind farm project proposed by Suncor that would eventually span the Lambton County municipalities of Huron Shores, Plympton-Wyoming and Enniskillen Township.

Bill Wright, a long-time Plympton-Wyoming resident and spokesman for the group, said W.AI.T. intends to do everything it can to prevent industrial wind turbines from every being built in Plympton-Wyoming.

“That’s why we exist,” he said. Read the rest of this entry

Green energy woes discussed at Lambton NFU annual meeting

By John Phair Today’s Farmer

There’s not a whole lot good about wind turbines, or for that matter, Ontario’s Green Energy Act.

At least that seemed to be the general opinion expressed at the annual meeting of Local 328 (Lambton County) National ­Farmers Union, held recently at the Forest Agricultural Society Hall.

The organization’s outgoing president said issues surrounding wind generators and the Green Energy Act were among his greatest concerns for the rural community as he wrapped up his term of office.

“The thing that had the biggest impact on me are issues regarding wind generators and green energy and the true costs behind them,” said Joe Vye in his report to the membership.

Vye stressed that he hopes no one signs a lease agreement with any energy company, whether it be a natural gas, oil, wind or solar company without having it vetted by a lawyer who specializes in that field.

He noted that he was recently asked to look over a contract from an oil company that wanted to drill on one of his neighbour’s land and was astounded by what he read. Read the rest of this entry

Living beside a MASSIVE solar plant

Wind turbines blow down resale value of homes: Pedlar

By Heather Wright Sarnia this Week 

GRAND BEND – If you can see a wind turbine from your window, chances are your house is going to sell for a lot less money than you want.

That’s the message Doug Pedlar, a real estate broker with ReMax in Grand Bend, brought to about 300 people in the village recently. Pedler talked with a number of real estate professionals across the province about the impact of industrial wind turbines on home sales and found studies about the subject from around the world. He says in general, the value of a home within view of the rotating blades takes longer to sell and could sell for 30 percent less than market value.

Pedlar says in one case in Simcoe, a real estate agent was trying to sell a 25 acre vacant hobby farm with a wind turbine behind it. He listed the lakeview property for about $149,000, expecting to sell it for about $135,000. Six months later he finally got an offer of $65,000. All seven of the potential buyers asked the agent about the wind turbine. Read the rest of this entry

3 Excellent speakers on IWTs @ Grand Bend- Feb 16th

Grand Bend: Public Info Meeting on Wind Turbines

Grand Bend:  Public Information Meeting

Date:                Thursday February 16th, 2012
Time:              7:00 PM
Location:      Grand Bend Public School, 15 Gill Road, Grand Bend MAP

—————————————————————————————–

Speakers:

 1. Environment: Birds/Waterfowl

Dr. Scott Petrie, B.Sc, PhD – Executive director of Long Point Waterfowl and Adjunct Professor at the University of Western Ontario. Scott will outline the potential impacts that Industrial Wind Turbines could have on wetland habitat and water fowl, in the lower Great Lakes area.

2. Electrical Pollution: Home/Farm/School

David Colling – A dairy farmer for 30 years inRipley,ON, who has also been a dealer for Bio-Ag Consultants and Distributors since 1991. David studied Electrical Engineering at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, and currently uses his vast knowledge, through out Ontario, to assess electrical pollution in homes, farms and businesses that are presently in the vicinity of Industrial Wind Turbines

3. Property Value: Real Estate

Doug Pedlar – Doug is a Broker of Record for RE/MAX Bluewater Realty in the Grand Bend Area. Doug has many years as a respected Realtor within the community, and will speak on the effects that Industrial Wind Turbines currently have on property values, and how the Industrialization of the local community will impact its residents’ property values. 

Contact:  Middlesex-Lambton Wind Action Group windactiongroup@gmail.com

The pics that wind reps DON’T show farmers….(this is Zephyr)

So this is the Brooke-Alvisnton Zephyr project from the air yesterday. I’m just looking at al those tracks across the fields — were they crop touring , or what? Why even have roads and lanes if they don’t use them? Nice and gentle onthat land, eh?

Then imagine you are driving a tractor— you used to have a straight field to plow, but now you are wheeling around the lanes and towers; your field is all cut up into triangles and squares. Be sure to calculate in the extra time and fuel to plant, plough and harvest this field.

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