Category Archives: Transmission

Bluewater files for intervener status for Goshen Wind leave to Construct

Goshen transmission mapLakeshore Advance
The municipality will seek intervener status for Next Era’s leave to construct for the Goshen Wind Energy Centre. Since the municipality only had 10 days left to file for intervener status, Bluewater’s Chief Administrative Officer Steve McAuley, asked council how they wished to proceed with the leave to construct.

“We need to deal with this notice because they come fast and fierce. It’s the nature of the beast,” said McAuley at the meeting. McAuley suggested to council that they seek intervener status, so they can be informed of the comings and goings happening with the Ontario Energy Board and also ask for an oral hearing and to have their costs to be covered. The exact same thing council requested for Next Era’s previous leave to construct for the Bluewater Wind Energy Centre.

McAuley said that since the municipality had requested intervener status and an oral hearing with Next Era’s Bluewater Wind Energy Centre, council can expect similar results, including not being appointed costs and not receiving the oral hearing. Read article

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Energy Board flooded with objections to NextEra’s transmission project

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Sarnia Lambton Independent
NextEra Energy is facing stiff opposition to its transmission plan. Dozens of people, organizations, and businesses have filed to be interveners at an Ontario Energy Board Hearing on the transmission line project to serve three of NextEra’s projects including the Jericho Wind Energy project in Lambton Shores.

The company plans to erect 100 foot poles over 30 km along roads in Middlesex County to carry the power generated by the wind projects near Strathroy and Lambton Shores. But some neighbours are not pleased. The OEB allowed 10 days for people to register to take part in the hearing to approve the plan, at least 15 landowners and nine other organizations want a say in the hearing.

Middlesex County, Adelaide Township and North Middlesex want to be involved in the hearing. So does Hydro One, the Independent Electric System Operator, and Entegrus Transmission Lines. The Middlesex Lambton Wind Action Group – a citizens group which has been objecting to the industrial wind projects in the area – also wants a say. Read article

First, mega-turbines . . . now, giant poles

By Debora Van Brenk, The London Free Press
Get ready for the next tilt in Southwestern Ontario’s transformation into the province’s wind-energy hotbed: 10-storey-high poles to help collect all that power. Debora Van Brenk looks at the early static one wind energy giant’s plans are creating in Middlesex County.

A wind energy giant’s plan to put up 10-storey poles and high-voltage wires along Middlesex County roads is sparking energetic attention. The Ontario Energy Board will consider the application by NextEra Energy Canada to put up poles from its proposed three wind farms along about 30 km of Middlesex roads north and northwest of Strathroy. The county and two residents want permission to speak at a hearing — no date set yet — and more than 24 others have asked to be observers.

The county wants to make sure any poles on municipal rights-of-way don’t interfere with existing or planned infrastructure such as bridges, utilities or drainage ditches, Middlesex engineer Chris Traini. “Anything that would be of public use to the residents should take precedence over transmission poles,” he said.

The county is obligated to share its rights-of-way with utilities, and Traini said he wants to make sure residents’ interests are protected. Council has also expressed concerns about the possible effect on drivers of roadway sign and pole clutter. Traini said the county also wants the energy board to help draw lines of clear responsibility for maintenance and safety of the lines and poles. Read article

Activist question why wind companies surveyed Rock Glen

rockglenHeather Wright, Sarnia-Lambton Independent
Muriel Allingham is questioning why the Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority would allow wind energy companies to survey sensitive areas such as Rock Glen Conservation Area. Documents released by the authority released to Allingham, a member of Middlesex Lambton Wind Action, show a company called CanAcre, working for NextEra Energy on the Goshen and Jericho projects in Lambton and Middlesex, signed an agreement with the ABCA to have access to conservation land for field studies. Rock Glen Conservation Area in Arkona was among the nine tracts of land surveyed.

Conservation Authority General Manager Tom Proutt says the agreements were signed two-years ago, before there was wide-spread concern for the project. He says the company offered to survey the land and do an inventory of the plants and wildlife. “The agreements that wind energy companies had asked us for were part of their environmental studies they were doing,” says Proutt. “They were looking at our properties in terms of what was there and that was information that we would find useful because we don’t have the time or money to inventory our lands.”

But Allingham says the conservation authority should have known the companies were looking to use the lands – a use she says would not be appropriate. “Conservation lands are just that and it (wind energy projects) displaces wildlife and their mandate is to protect land and wildlife. Read article

New transmission lines spark plans for up to 51 wind turbines near Petrolia

enniskillen-windHeather Wright, Sarnia Lambton Independent
Enniskillen politicians and residents are watching with worry as three companies make the rounds asking landowners south of Petrolia to sign leases for wind turbines. Enniskillen Mayor Kevin Marriott says in the last few months three companies have been speaking with the municipality about projects which could bring as many as 51 turbines to the rural township.

The mayor says there has been major interest since the Ontario Energy Board gave approval for Hydro One’s $40 million upgrade of a major transmission line which goes from the Lambton Generating Station into London. The upgrade allows for up to 500 megawatts of additional renewable power in the area according to documents filed at the time with the OEB. “These transmission lines that are coming from the Courtright coal-fired facility are being upgraded and all of the sudden there is an interest to feed that line,” he says. Read article

NextEra threatens legal action against Bluewater Township

nexterrorBy Mac Christie, Times-Advocate Staff
[excerpt] VARNA – NextEra Energy, the developer responsible for the Goshen and Bluewater wind projects, which propose 52 turbines for the municipality between the two, also addressed council at its Feb. 19 meeting. Nicole Geneau, the project director for the Bluewater and Goshen projects, updated council on where the projects stand.

She noted the company expects to hear back from the government about the Bluewater project in mid-March. “We would anticipate starting construction, as I’ve always maintained, in the middle of this year, so June of 2013,” she said. “We would be fully operational by the end of this calendar year.”

NextEra’s legal counsel John Terry, with the law firm Torys in Toronto, spoke to council about the bylaw. He expressed concern with the bylaw, noting NextEra is making serious investments with regard to the project. “There are certain limitations as to what municipalities can do under the provisions of the Green Energy Act,” Terry said. “Council has to be very careful about staying within what it’s legally empowered to do. “I must say, when you look at the numbers involved . . . I am concerned that once we look at it that we may find that some of the proposals here are going beyond what municipalities can do.” He added there may be similar concerns regarding the unreleased road use agreement.

Terry added NextEra does have certain legal rights that they are willing to pursue. “If it becomes necessary to take steps in court in regard to bylaws that are passed or potentially to have to seek damages, if damages are involved, then NextEra will have no choice but to follow those routes,” he said. “There are very serious legal issues at stake here.” Read article

Field Notes from a Landowner/NextEra Wind Meeting

wind-liar-447x292I attended a meeting of ~ 20 landowners along the proposed 115KV transmission from the Adelaide Wind project north to the “tap” into the 500 kv line at Nairn. The NextEra/FPL project manager was there with 2 “landmen” (that’s what they’re called). The whole meeting was about 1.5 hours total. It was a “mixed” meeting in that roughly half the attendees were signed to wind leases. NextEra agreed to the meeting in the hopes that they could answer questions about the trans line and hopefully get the adjoining landowners to sign easements that would facilitate placement and alignment of the poles.

To better understand the situation, it is helpful to know the layout:

1) County Rd. #6 is an old, narrow roadway with houses very close to the road. An historic building, the old Keyser General Store literally sits on the roadway, in fact, only about 10′ of the store are on the owners’ property.

2) For a distance of over 5 miles, adjoining landowners are refusing to sign transmission easements. One property owner turned down an amount in excess of $200,000. Another refused over $150,000. These are people who do not want to sell-out and move; nor, do they want their farm operations damaged. Read the rest of this entry

NexTerror Wind and Rural Fear

DSCN6594by Harvey Wrightman
The Liberal party, engaged in a collective effort of navel-gazing, is puzzled as to why rural residents have such irrational fear of the great green future planned for them – all the prospective leadership candidates affirm that the wind energy program will proceed as planned.

One of the newest wrinkles to the wind program is now coming to light. The 300 or so wind turbines planned for north east Lambton, north west Middlesex and southern Huron Counties require transmission lines to get to Hydro’s 500kv main line some 40 km away. The wind companies, in their typical corporate arrogance, planned their projects first, leaving transmission details for later, never anticipating that things here would be any different than they are in Kansas or Missouri where you send out your “landmen” (that’s what this particular breed of slime is called) to offer a few dollars for the easements required – and the poles are up before anyone even knows about it. Almost everything on private land so there are no hassles with municipal or State bureaucrats. So, we can do the same thing here, right? – Well, not exactly. Read the rest of this entry

Anti-wind groups watching transmission line battle

Zephyr1201240015by Heather Wright, Sarnia This Week
Middlesex Lambton Wind Action is closely watching talks between Middlesex County and NextEra Energy. NextEra has several wind projects in Middlesex and Lambton County. It’s planning to build transmission lines to carry the energy created by the turbines in southern Ontario and it wants to build them on municipal and county right of ways.

NextEra recently went to Middlesex County Council to talk about the plan. Draft documents from the Jericho project, with 92 turbines in Lambton Shores and Warwick, show the transmission lines would also stretch into Lambton County. Lambton County Councilors recently gave county staff authority to negotiate with wind energy companies about access to county right of ways.

Esther Wrightman of Middlesex Lambton Wind Action says NextEra wants to build a separate line of polls to carry the energy being produced because Hydro One would not allow NextEra’s lines on their poles. In some areas, that could mean Hydro One poles on one side of the road and NextEra’s on the other.

“A good portion of our county roads will have poles on each side of the road,” she says. “You just double the chance of hitting a pole (in an accident) by putting poles on the other side of the road, too.” Middlesex County engineers have asked NextEra to come back to the county with plans from an engineer. Wrightman is pleased, saying the transmission lines will have a devastating effect on the landscape of rural Ontario.

“They will be running by people’s homes, near schools; it is very invasive, it is going to drastically change the community.” She’s also concerned about the infrastructure left behind “white elephants with transmission lines running down your road” she calls them, should the energy companies pull the turbines out of service. Read the rest of this entry

Video: Nextera asks Middlesex County for transmission on right of way

Nextera wants Middlesex county’s help

Deb Van Brenk, London Free Press

North America’s largest wind energy company generated local static Tuesday as it asked Middlesex County to smooth the process in allowing transmission lines along county roads.

The transmission poles would connect NextEra’s three proposed wind farms near Thedford, Parkhill and Strathroy along county-owned roads.

County councillors expressed concerns about the poles’ height — each would be about 35 metres tall — possible conflicts with other services, such as drainage and hydro, and clearance at intersections.

Southwest Middlesex Mayor Vance Blackmore wondered if they would exacerbate worries that Middlesex roads already have too many signs and poles.

County engineer Chris Traini said, “In a perfect world, we would limit the amount of above-ground utilities if possible.”

But he conceded the county is required to share its rights-of-way and needs to make sure policies are in place to protect county interests.

That means NextEra should not consider this a negotiation but a matter of following county policies, said Adelaide Metcalfe Mayor David Bolton. Read the rest of this entry

Nextera’s transmission troubles in Middlesex & Lambton

In Middlesex County, Nextera has two wind projects up for final public comment: Adelaide and Bornish, totaling 83 turbines, for now. The company’s plan is to connect these two projects, as well as the 92 turbine Nextera Jericho and 62 Suncor Cedar Point projects, with one massive transmission line. Problem is, the route isn’t figured out yet. Remember, the public is supposed to be filing their final comments right now on  complete project documents, and yet this very significant piece of information isn’t available for the public to comment on, or even view.

The map (above right) shows a ‘proposed’ route – this is all the public, the county, the townships and the Ministry of Environment are supposed to know right now. In fact, this route has not been secured. Landowners refused to sign easements; Hydro Ones said ‘no’ to sharing their poles. And now Nextera is planning to ask Middlesex County council to allow the company to erect their own 90’ poles with 115kv lines on the other side of the county’s road; hoping that council will ignore the significant safety risk that this will pose to regular travelers by doubling the number of hydro poles on county road allowance.

But this isn’t the whole story. Nextera has a plan “C”, lovingly called the “Back Country” route. The locals started cluing into this plan when residents were being approached by CanAcre landmen to sign 100′ transmission easements through the back of their lots— in some cases through mature, hard maple bush. At the final public meeting when company representatives were asked about this route, they twisted away from saying it was so, until they were certain that we were not going to tolerate being lied to. One rep was asked: if they were to use this route, would they not have to have another public meeting to unveil this new plan? Yes, he said they would. But no new meeting has taken place, so we just assumed they were using one of the other routes….until we saw these documents at the MOE office in London (they were only placed on the company’s website 3 days ago, after complaints to the MOE were made). Take a look at pg.11 and on – these are personal notes that the CanAcre landmen took while trying to sign-up the ‘Back Country’ land. Why was this sent to the MOE? Do they intend to still use this route? It would appear that that would still be a big possibility as to this day, CanAcre is still making their rounds in the community, trying to get the land signed that they need.

What would this ‘Back Country’ route look like? Nextera of course does not have a map available, but residents were able to piece it together by basically following the plow lines in the fields and assembling the map below. The Red line is the “Back country” and the Yellow is the current Proposed Line. Be sure to follow those lines, right through the woodlot— and remember this is supposed to be ‘green energy’.

Does it not fly in the face of reason that council and the public are only now being shown all the various transmission routes that this company is contemplating? We are in the middle of the final 30 day comment periods for both the Bornish and Adelaide projects – this is the last time the Ministry of Environment allows us to comment on these projects. If the MOE has truly reviewed all of Nextera’s Bornish and Adelaide Project Documents, and deemed them complete so that we could review them – does it not seem like they may be missing a large piece of the puzzle, of WHERE the transmission lines are going? We know of three different transmission routes: on Hydro One’s poles, on the other side of the county road, and the ‘back country route’ – all of which are still being actively pursued by the wind company. We are being asked to comment on incomplete and unavailable information… or perhaps they do not wish to have the public’s comments and that is why we are left out of the decision making.

Group Wants Wind Farm Info Online

Avery Moore, Blackburn News
A local wind action group is calling on the provincial government to make information on wind farms more accessible. Members of the Middlesex Wind Action Group participated in a 2 hour ”read-in” at the Exeter Road Ministry of the Environment offices Friday.

They were there to read the one and only hard copy of a plan for a wind farm going up near Parkhill. The group’s leader, Esther Wrightman, says traveling to the MOE in London is the only way to get access to specific details on wind farm plans. Wrightman says the provincial government should make the documents available online and in township offices and libraries in rural communities.

Nextera approaching Middlesex County Council for road allowance- 115kv Transmission Lines

Date: November 27
Time: 1:00 pm
Place: Middlesex County Building, 399 Ridout St. North, London MAP

Nextera Letter to Middlesex County Council

Nextera is seeking use of Middlesex County’s road allowance for their own personal 115kv transmission line to connec the Adelaide, Jericho and Bornish wind projects, or so they think for now. You see, they have several plans inplay, and even though the wind projects are in their final days of public comment period, the wind company still does not have a transmission route figured out. They seem to be under the illusion that we don’t need/want to comment on this as well?

This proposal to county council asks that we allow the double lining our roads with hydro poles, doubling the safety risk for road traffic. They will be 90′ poles, erected in front of residents homes and farms. For who? For a company from Florida. Be there to say NO!

New transmission line approved – more wind projects to come

By Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer

The Ontario Energy Board has approved Hydro One’s plan to spend $40 million upgrading a transmission line through Lambton County. The project is designed to enable about 500 MW of renewable power generation west of London by installing higher capacity wire and new insulators on existing towers, between the Lambton Transfer Station in St. Clair Township and the Longwood station near London.

In a ruling dated Nov. 8, the board says it finds “the proposed project to be in the public interest.” The project will have “a small impact” on transmission rates, adding 0.01% to the average residential consumer bill, the board says.

“The company does now have the approvals necessary to proceed with the project,” said Hydro One spokesperson Nancy Shaddick. She added construction is scheduled to begin in the spring and the updated line should be in service by the end of 2014.

“Anything like that is a positive thing,” said St. Clair Township Mayor Steve Arnold. “We need to make sure we keep things as modern as we can so we continue to be the energy producer of the province down in Lambton County.”

The board’s approval came over objections by the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation and the Haudenosunee Development Institute at Six Nations. Chief Joe Miskokomon, of the Chippewas of the Thames, said recent courting rulings have required industry to “consult with First Nations and accommodate their concerns” in these types of projects. “This is not a new issue being raised by us,” he said. “It’s an issue that has been raised across this country, in many different locations.” Read the rest of this entry

The company comes to tea

by Harvey Wrightman
In the Nextera Bornish project near Parkhill, a 115 kv line is proposed to link projects in north Lambton (the Jericho and Camlachie wind projects) and another 115 kv line is planned for the west Middlesex (Adelaide) wind project.  Both lines to converge at a new substation at Nairn that will “tap” into the 500 kv line. Nairn and Seaforth are the only two “taps” that Hydro will allow. That  both would be built by NextEra/FPL (NexTerror) is interesting.

NexTerror has an inside track in its dealings with this government.

Because both lines are high voltage, they require easements with adjoining landowners. I’m not sure of the status of those easement acquisitions for Bluewater; but, there is considerable resistance to both the Jericho/Camlachie line and the Adelaide line. Both happen to feature buildings of historical significance that are on the municipal road – you can’t just shove string lines over them.

Another feature of NexTerror is it’s cheap – it doesn’t offer much compensation fto landowners for what is a permanent easement with rather vague,open-ended in wording, and paltry, one-time compensation compared to the decrease in property value that will occur with 100′ poles out front, strung with multiple lines.

I attended a landowner meeting in late July where a NexTerror  rep (project manager) was present with two “landmen” from the land acquisition company that does the sign-up work for the needed easements and options, some interesting statements were made:

  1. To a resident’s question about responsibility, ” …if someone did hit one of these poles, where would you phone, Florida?”  the NexTerror rep replied that, “… what we would do is ummmm, if we had Hydro One infrastructure there as well, uhhh if we had both on the poles (combined Hydro and NexTerror lines), uhhh we would actually give them to – sell them for a dollar to Hydro One, and then we’d rent back off them so you’d phone Hydro One. Typically, what would happen regardless even if Hydro One didn’t own them, we’d enter into an agreement for Hydro One to respond.”
    One wonders, if Hydro doesn’t own the lines, what incentive would Hydro have to look after a line that may very well cause stray voltage and power surges? Hasn’t that happened elsewhere?
  2. Re: pole siting on road allowance or private land, the rep states, “…well, we’d have a couple of options. Under the Ontario Electricity act we have the right to go on the municipal right of way. In our permit applications…we’ve shown them in the road right of way. So that’s the first option and that’s what we would press for.”
    A resident then asks, “What gives you the right to do this as a foreign company?”  The rep replies, “The Ontario Electricity Act….as a transmitter in Ontario, the road right of ways were built or exist in part to allow utilities such as the gas line to go up there. A transmitter in Ontario is considered a utility like that and as such has the right to use.”  The resident interjects, “It’s still a private company.” and the rep says, “Just like Enbridge or Union Gas.”
    The problem here is that NexTerror would be both a transmitter and generator and with very little regulation applied to it.
    Read the rest of this entry

Massive line clears way for wind projects

GREEN ENERGY: $700-million project completed
By JOHN MINER, The London Free Press

Completion of the biggest transmission line project in Ontario in 20 years clears an important hurdle for a series of massive wind turbine projects in Southwestern Ontario, including eight within 70 kilometres of London.

Completed six months ahead of schedule, the $700-million Bruce to Milton transmission project will allow electricity to flow from refurbished reactors at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station, and from wind and solar projects that have received conditional contracts under Ontario’s green energy program. Read the rest of this entry

NextEra’s ‘double secret’ transmission line

So when a Final Public Meeting for a wind project is published, with a map of the turbine locations and transmission lines, you most likely think, “Well, it’s set in stone”. Or at the very least you’ll think that the wind company is giving the full story, you know… ACCURATE information, after all what’s the point in the public commenting on INACCURATE info? But what if the company doesn’t quite have all it’s info together and they are scrambling to meet deadlines? They wouldn’t LIE to you now, would they– you know, kinda ‘fudge’ the details? They wouldn’t, say, have their transmission lines go down a completely different line then what is shown on their ‘public notice’ map….would they?

Oh of course they would. Especially if the company name is NextEra. Take a look at what is developing for the NextEra Projects in Middlesex and Lambton counties (Adelaide 38 turbines, Bornish 45 turbines and Jericho 92 turbines = 175 turbines total). They are hooking all these projects together with one transmission line that NextEra has to build. Apparently easier said than done as landowners are telling them to shove their $60 000 easement offers you know where.

Judging by the NextEra easement options being requested and signed in the area, the transmission line is not going down Nairn Rd as the ‘public’ maps shows,  it’s cutting through the back lots between Nairn Rd. and Coldstream Rd. That isn’t a clear path of nothing land – they plan to cut 100ft right-of-ways through Hard (Sugar) Maple bush – and lots of it. That’s how ‘green’ these projects are. Wherever they can get their lines through, that’s where they will go, it doesn’t matter what they destroy to make this happen.

Wind companies swap land leases

Suncor Energy says there’s nothing unusual about a land swap agreement it has in Lambton and Middlesex counties with a neighbouring wind company.

Suncor plans to build an up to 62 wind turbine Cedar Point Wind Power Project in parts of Plympton-Wyoming and Lambton Shores. Lambton Shores is also where Nextera Energy plans to build its proposed 150-MW Jericho Wind Energy Centre.

The Middlesex-Lambton Wind Action Group, one of the local citizens’ groups opposed to wind farms, recently posted to its website a copy of a Suncor document about the swap agreement with Nextera.

“What I can say is that’s a normal part of business agreements that take place from time to time,” said Suncor spokesperson Michael Southern.

“The reason why Suncor would consider something like that is if it helps us in developing the best wind power project we can.”

The correspondence states the companies have decided to separate their projects by exchanging of options for easements from landowners each holds in the proposed areas for the wind farms.

The document says land agents for the two companies will be contacting landowners to discuss the transfer.

“They got all the leases they could higgledy-piggledy, and now they’re starting to swap them so that they’re more strategic,” said Marcelle Brooks, a member of the wind action group. Read the rest of this entry

Wind bidding war in Middlesex & Lambton

Wind companies trading leases “like monopoly”, offering cash for extensions: opponents

By Heather Wright, Sarnia Lambton This Week
LAMBTON SHORES – Jim thought it would be a great way to secure the future of his family farm, but now the land lease he signed with Suncor Energy is making him feel anything but secure.

The Lambton Shores man, who asked us to protect his identity, is in the middle of Suncor’s Cedar Point industrial wind farm. The company wants to erect 62 turbines – half of those in Lambton Shores – to generate power. Not far from Jim’s farm, NextEra is preparing to build an industrial wind farm with 92 turbines.

Jim signed the land lease with Suncor nearly five years ago – long before he had researched any of the potential problems which people who live near the turbines are reporting. For him, it was a way to keep his family farm afloat.

“I said, ‘Well, to secure this for my grandchildren I’ll put that windmill on it. I don’t have to worry about the farm because the taxes will be paid for me.’”

Jim and several other landowners in Lambton Shores are coming close to a deadline in the leases which would allow them to opt out of the contract. Jim has decided not to sign on again saying the turbines “are unsafe, they’re not green and they’re going to bankrupt the province.”

But Suncor and NextEra are now swapping land leases and farmers like Jim are feeling the pressure to sign extensions to those deals are hoping to abandon.

Sarnia Lambton This Week has obtained a letter from Suncor Energy which explained the land lease swap to the landowners.

“Jericho and Suncor, by virtue of a Land Swap Agreement, have agreed to separate their projects and thereby maximize efficiency through an exchange of interests in certain optioned lands. Accordingly, certain lands that are currently held under option by Jericho will become part of Suncor’s renewable energy project and certain lands that are currently held under option by Suncor will become part of Jericho’s renewable energy project,” writes Chris Moger, surface landman for Suncor. “We believe that this exchange is in the best interest of both projects and all landowners participating in those projects.”

Marcelle Brooks of Middlesex Lambton Wind Concerns isn’t surprised by the move. “Quite a while ago, there was a free for all going on” as companies tried to option land from local farmers. “There really was not a plan in place…it was like whoever had the most leases in place was the winner – it was like Monopoly…you buy up everything.” Read the rest of this entry

“They want an easement, but I won’t give it to them. They will have to expropriate it.”

Walking against the lines

By Heather Wright  Sarnia this Week 

PLYMPTON-WYOMING – In a flood of people concerned about the effects of wind turbines, Paul Marsh stands out. And it isn’t just because he’s holding a picket sign.
Marsh lives in Sylvan – a community south east of Thedford just over the Middlesex County line. He, too, says he will be affected by the 62 turbine Cedar Point Wind Power project in Plympton-Wyoming.
Marsh won’t be too close to the turbines and it’s unlikely he’ll be able to see them since his 30 acre property is filled with trees.
What he will notice is a power transmission line which will run the length of his corner lot property.
“The transmission lines which are going to take the power from here will go right by my house,” said Marsh as he stood in front of the doors of the Camlachie Community Centre where Suncor was holding an open house recently. “The power generated here will go by my house. Everybody thinks about the turbines themselves but not how they move the power.”
The Cedar Point project isn’t the only industrial wind farm which will benefit from the new power lines. NextEra Energy also expects to hook into the line leading to feeder lines near the Bruce Power plant for its Jericho project in Lambton Shores.
“Right now, the small projects can feed into the grid, but they won’t be able to once there are 100s of them.”
And it is obvious Marsh is not happy about it. Suncor wants an easement – legal permission – to erect the power lines on between 60 and 80 feet at the edge of his property.
He had a “90 second conversation” about the idea with officials and now says the company will have find another way.
“They want an easement, but I won’t give it to them. They will have to expropriate it.”

NextEra’s favourite word: EXPROPRIATION

Summerhaven Wind Project approved by province
Announcement for the 59-unit installation near Jarvis came Friday
By MONTE SONNENBERG, QMI Agency

HALDIMAND COUNTY – An appeal is planned now that the Summerhaven wind turbine project near Jarvis has received provincial approval.

Approval for the 59-unit installation was announced Friday. The next step in the process is a 15-day appeal period. Monday, a representative of Haldimand Wind Concerns said her group is consulting with a lawyer.

“We’ll know more in a few days,” says Betty Ortt of Jarvis, secretary of Haldimand Wind Concerns. “I can’t say anything more than that. The support we need right now is financial.”

Sponsor of the Summerhaven project is NextEra Energy Canada. If the $270 million project moves ahead, turbines will be clustered around Jarvis and Rainham Centre. Josie Hernandez, spokesperson for NextEra, says the industry in Ontario considers an appeal to the Ministry of the Environment to be standard procedure.

“Our approach now is wait-and-see,” she said Monday. “We understand this is something we have to contend with.”

If the turbines arrive, they will not be popular.

Haldimand Wind Concerns and its 200 members have been spreading the word for more than a year that turbines will lower property values, blight the landscape, pose a threat to wildlife and produce power at a price – 13.5 cents per kilowatt hour – that is not conducive to job creation.

“We already have so much excess power,” Ortt said. “We in Ontario already have to pay our neighbours to take our power when we have a surplus. That’s such a waste of ratepayers’ money.”

Jarvis-area Coun. Leroy Bartlett, Ward One’s representative on Haldimand council, confirmed there is stiff opposition to the Summerhaven project. He also confirmed that some landowners are refusing NextEra an easement for transmission lines and may ultimately be forced to co-operate through provincial orders.

“We take legal action if we have to,” Hernandez said. “It’s not something we want to do, but unfortunately it is an option for us.”

Read the rest of this entry

Stray voltage = Wind developers problem- not Hydro One’s

What I learnt at the Hydro One transmission meeting last night:

Wind Developers: if YOU install ANY transmission lines (collector lines etc.) in our communities— YOU must fix the Stray Voltage that occurs, not Hydro One. That includes the lines proposed to surround my kid’s school and playground.  So don’t bother telling me anything otherwise at any more of your twisted meetings.

Lambton to Longwood 70km Transmission Upgrade

From Hydro One:

Notice of Commencement and Invitation to Public Information Centre
Lambton to Longwood Transmission Upgrade Class Environmental Assessment

Date: January 18
Time: 5 – 8 p.m.
Location: Southwest Middlesex Arena, Auditorium 138 Mill Street, Glencoe

Date: January 19
Time: 5 – 8 p.m.
Location: Brigden Community Hall 3016 Brigden Road, Brigden

Hydro One Networks Inc. (“Hydro One”) invites you to a Public Information Centre to learn more about plans to upgrade an existing double-circuit 230 kilovolt transmission line. The transmission line, as shown on the map below, connects Lambton Transformer Station (TS) in the Township of St. Clair with Longwood TS in the Municipality of Strathroy-Caradoc. Consistent with Province of Ontario’s Long-Term Energy Plan, this project is required by the end of 2014 to increase capacity of the transmission system west of London to carry additional power from renewable, gas and other sources. The project involves replacing the conductor (wire) and insulators on the existing transmission towers. Hydro One will also repair selected tower foundations to ensure the long-term structural integrity of the transmission line.

Project Planning and Approvals
This project is being planned in accordance with the Class Environmental Assessment for Minor Transmission Facilities. The project will undergo an initial Environmental Screening. Screening criteria will be used to assess the potential significance of effects. If significant effects cannot be avoided, Hydro One will carry out a full Class Environmental Assessment. The project will also require approval under Section 92 of the Ontario Energy Board Act, 1998. The Ontario Energy Board regulates the electricity sector in Ontario and will review Hydro One’s “Leave to Construct” application to determine if the construction and operation of the proposed project is in the public interest.

Opportunities for public input exist throughout both the environmental planning and Ontario Energy Board review processes.

Public Information Centres
Interested parties are invited to attend one of our public information centres to learn more about the project and to provide comments to our project team.

For More Information
If you have any questions or want to be added to the project mailing list, please contact: Carrie-Lynn Ognibene, Community Relations Hydro One Networks Inc. Tel: 1-877-345-6799 E-mail: Community.Relations@HydroOne.com www.HydroOne.com/projects  

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Hydro transmission upgrade inches ahead  By CATHY DOBSON, The Observer

A major upgrade to a 70-kilometre transmission line slicing through Lambton County bodes well for the local economy, community leaders say.

Hydro One plans to hold public consultations this month about adding capacity to the existing double-circuit 230-kilovolt transmission line stretching from the Lambton transformer station in St. Clair Township to the Longwood transformer station in Strathroy-Caradoc. Read the rest of this entry