Category Archives: Cedar Point Project

Over 100 wind turbines in Middlesex County now under construction

DSCF4734Right now in Middlesex County:

  • Suncor’s Adelaide wind project was approved today: read more
  • WPD’s Napier project approved last week: read more
  • NextEra’s Adelaide wind project is almost done the appeal process. read more
  • NextEra’s Bornish wind project’s appeal denied. read more

All the proposed wind projects in Middlesex County (above) have now been approved and will be under construction, if they aren’t’ already. That’s over 100 wind turbines. If you want to see what it look like, check these pictures out, or come out and see for yourself.

In Lambton county:

  • NextEra’s Jericho wind up for final public comment: read more
  • Suncor’s Cedar Point wind up for final public comment: read more

That’s another 130+ wind turbines.

Grand Bend? That’s another 111 turbines.

This is what Christmas looks like to many in rural Middlesex and Lambton Counties.

If you have 100 good ideas of how to stop the wind turbines, just implement 1 of them on your own. That makes a difference. Action is what is need!

Mom asking wind companies to move wind turbine sites away from autistic son

sarah hornblowerPaul Morden, Sarnia Observer
Sarah Hornblower says intensive behavioural intervention therapy has made a world of difference for Josh, her five-year-old autistic son. But, she worries wind farms coming to Lambton Shores will blow the progress away.

Hornblower and her husband, Chris, felt lucky when Josh qualified for the OHIP-covered in-home therapy after only a year or so on the waiting list. They saw families in other areas waiting much longer. “He wasn’t talking,” she said. “He wasn’t toilet trained. He wasn’t interacting at all. He wouldn’t look at you.” That changed after the therapy. “Through the work of these people, he’s fully toilet trained. He can speak, He’s learning to read. He can ride a bike . . . things we never thought were possible.”

The couple has seven children and three have been diagnosed with autism. Josh is the most severely impacted. Hornblower said they began hearing rumours about wind projects about a year after moving in 2007 to Ridge Road. There are already 10 turbines near Ravenswood and she initially thought a few more wouldn’t be a problem. Read article

Save the Bornish Eagles celebration pics

Yesterday was a beautiful day at the Bald Eagle Celebration, for so many reasons. But at the very end of the day, as about a dozen of of us were packing up, someone yelled, “Hey, look up!”. One of the Bornish Eagles was flying overhead – he circled around us for about a minute, and then took off in the direction of the proposed NextEra Bornish wind project. Some things you just can’t put words to…. this was one of them.

Save the Bornish Eagles! Community Awareness Celebration – May 25th

Eagle Celebration flyer – print and distribute!eagle celebrationDate: Saturday, May 25
Time: 1:00-5:00PM
Place: West Williams Community Centre, 32217 Kerwood Road, Parkhill  MAP (right beside the eagle nest)
NextEra vs Eagles Video

Plympton-Wyoming eyes changes to turbine bylaw; meets with Suncor

courtSarnia Lambton This Week
PLYMPTON-WYOMING – The lawyer representing Plympton-Wyoming in its court battle against Suncor’s wind project says the municipality may clarify its bylaw after a recent court decision. This, while the municipality and Suncor meet to try to resolve some of their differences about the Cedar Point Wind Energy Center. Suncor has a plan to build a 100 megawatt project with up to 46 turbines in Plympton-Wyoming and Lambton Shores. Suncor is following the rules set out by the Green Energy Act, including keeping the giant turbines 550 meters from the nearest homes.

But Plympton-Wyoming Council was concerned about that distance saying there are reports of people becoming ill from the sounds and shadow flicker so close to the turbines. It passed its own bylaw under the Municipal Act to have the turbines two kilometers away from homes. Mayor Lonny Napper says the bylaw was passed to protect residents’ health – which is a duty of politicians under the act.

When the province passed the Green Energy Act, it over-ruled every other type of legislation including local municipalities planning authority, but Napper and other municipal politicians believe the Municipal Act doesn’t fall under the Green Energy Act. Suncor disagrees and is taking Plympton-Wyoming to court to challenge the two kilometer limit and two other bylaws which impose high fees for development and a $200,000 deposit per turbine to deal with the cost of removing the towers in the future. Read article

Nextera, Suncor – Answers needed to questions about OUR schools & YOUR wind turbines

Dear Nextera, Suncor, Media and School Board trustees,

I am quite upset to see incorrect and confusing numbers reported in the media as to how many and how close wind turbines are to be from the schools in Lambton County. It is not the media’s fault.

Nextera, Suncor: I have reviewed wind project noise documents for 4 years – I should be competent in it by now. But I find I am tearing my hair out reviewing the documents, trying to find the exact noise, and distances turbines are to the schools in your projects.

Currently, my frustration stems from:

  1. The Bosanquet elementary school does not even have a Receptor ID on the project draft map.
  2. The hundreds of receptor ID’s are not numerically ordered in the noise chart – and I honestly can’t even find the school ID (or in this case, it’s neighbour’s, because it doesn’t have an ID).
  3. At the wind developer meetings, the schools are not even identified on the large maps. Security was called over when I wrote “school” on the map location for others to be able to see. How’s THAT for informing the public?? No wonder the media doesn’t know the true numbers… Read the rest of this entry

Suncor moving ahead with wind power project

PW NancyBy Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer
A Plympton-Wyoming residents’ group fighting Suncor’s Cedar Point Wind Power project says it has more than 700 signed objection letters, and it isn’t finished collecting them yet. We’re Against Industrial Turbines Plympton-Wyoming (WAIT-PW) collected the letters at three open houses Suncor held last week into its plans to build a 100-megawatt wind farm in Plympton-Wyoming, Lambton Shores and Warwick Township.

WAIT-PW’s Ingrid Willemsen and Keith Watson delivered the letters to Suncor officials at the final open house in Watford, and asked the company to cancel the project. While the Suncor official they spoke with didn’t give any indication that would happen, “she definitely looks like she feels the pressure from the community,” Willemsen said. “I don’t know how they could turn a blind eye to so much protest.”

Members of WAIT-PW, as well as the Middlesex Lambton Wind Action Group and Conservation of Rural Enniskillen, a newly formed anti-wind turbine group in Enniskillen Township, were at the open houses also held in Camlachie and Thedford to rally against the company’s plans. Read article

Suncor risks reputation in fight for green

suncorChris Cooke, First Monday
Suncor Energy can tell us “renewable is part of its integrated energy strategy”. But the real strategy is to make money. And there is a lot of green in green. And that’s the only reason the energy giant is picking a fight with the residents and municipality of Plympton Wyoming.

Michael Southern, Suncor’s communications manager and general talking head can push the right buttons and say what seem like the right words, but the reality is it’s all about the money. When Suncor can sell wind power into the Ontario grid at twenty times coal – fired energy you know company executives are doing a happy dance all the way to the bank.

How lucrative is it? Lucrative enough that Suncor is prepared to put its local reputation at risk. Lucrative enough that the company is prepared to put giant wind turbines within sight of million dollar homes along Lake Huron. And Mr. Talking Head can tell those of us interested enough to ask a few questions that its all about renewable energy, being green and dutifully following the Green Energy Act. However, the reality is it is all about the money. Read article

Suncor picks fight over wind turbines in Plympton Wyoming

DSCN1849Chris Cooke, First Monday
Michael Southern says it is “rare step” for Suncor Energy to challenge a municipal bylaw but that’s exactly what the giant energy company is doing in Plympton Wyoming. Suncor wants to proceed with 46 huge wind turbines along the lakeshore east of Camlachie within sight of expensive homes and residential areas. Southern, manager, communications and stakeholder relations for Suncor says the company has listened to the concerns of residents and downsized the Cedar Point Wind Farm from 62 turbines to 46. “We are committed to working within valid bylaws and laws of the Province of Ontario” says Southern but in the case of Plympton Wyoming and Cedar Point admits “we may require discretion be provided by the courts”.

The turbines will be 99.5 metres high and have blades 56.5 metres long. Residents impacted by the project are enraged. However, they have an ally in Plympton Wyoming, which is challenging Cedar Point, and requiring industrial turbines be at least two kilometres from neighbouring homes. Read article

Battle over turbines heating up this week

Keith ElizabethPaul Morden, Sarnia Observer
Keith Douglas and Elizabeth Bellavance call themselves “very private people” who didn’t expect to become anti-industrial wind turbine activists. They both grew up in rural Lambton, became veterinarians and eventually moved in 1997 to a farm on Plympton-Wyoming’s Aberarder Line. They were attracted by a view that rolls down to a creek and up a tree-covered hill. The farm’s workable acres are share-cropped but Douglas has also planted thousands of trees. Not far behind the house, the fence of a horse pasture stretches out from the barn and down the hill.

Mixed in with papers on a coffee table inside is an architect’s rendition of a new home the couple planned to build to take advantage of the view. “We let go of that plan last summer,” Bellavance said. About seven years before, a fellow came up their lane way looking for farmland to lease for a wind farm project.

Suncor Energy Projects has a Feed-In Tariff contract to sell energy from its up to 46-turbine Cedar Point Wind Power project. The company is now in the late stages of working through provincial approval to build the wind farm that will stretch across Plympton-Wyoming, Lambton Shores and into Warwick Township. “We didn’t just brush him off,” Bellavance said about the man who came offering a wind lease. “We had a look.” Read article

Energy Board flooded with objections to NextEra’s transmission project

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Sarnia Lambton Independent
NextEra Energy is facing stiff opposition to its transmission plan. Dozens of people, organizations, and businesses have filed to be interveners at an Ontario Energy Board Hearing on the transmission line project to serve three of NextEra’s projects including the Jericho Wind Energy project in Lambton Shores.

The company plans to erect 100 foot poles over 30 km along roads in Middlesex County to carry the power generated by the wind projects near Strathroy and Lambton Shores. But some neighbours are not pleased. The OEB allowed 10 days for people to register to take part in the hearing to approve the plan, at least 15 landowners and nine other organizations want a say in the hearing.

Middlesex County, Adelaide Township and North Middlesex want to be involved in the hearing. So does Hydro One, the Independent Electric System Operator, and Entegrus Transmission Lines. The Middlesex Lambton Wind Action Group – a citizens group which has been objecting to the industrial wind projects in the area – also wants a say. Read article

First, mega-turbines . . . now, giant poles

By Debora Van Brenk, The London Free Press
Get ready for the next tilt in Southwestern Ontario’s transformation into the province’s wind-energy hotbed: 10-storey-high poles to help collect all that power. Debora Van Brenk looks at the early static one wind energy giant’s plans are creating in Middlesex County.

A wind energy giant’s plan to put up 10-storey poles and high-voltage wires along Middlesex County roads is sparking energetic attention. The Ontario Energy Board will consider the application by NextEra Energy Canada to put up poles from its proposed three wind farms along about 30 km of Middlesex roads north and northwest of Strathroy. The county and two residents want permission to speak at a hearing — no date set yet — and more than 24 others have asked to be observers.

The county wants to make sure any poles on municipal rights-of-way don’t interfere with existing or planned infrastructure such as bridges, utilities or drainage ditches, Middlesex engineer Chris Traini. “Anything that would be of public use to the residents should take precedence over transmission poles,” he said.

The county is obligated to share its rights-of-way with utilities, and Traini said he wants to make sure residents’ interests are protected. Council has also expressed concerns about the possible effect on drivers of roadway sign and pole clutter. Traini said the county also wants the energy board to help draw lines of clear responsibility for maintenance and safety of the lines and poles. Read article

Plympton Wyoming Residents air concerns on wind turbines

Sarnia ObserverPWWAIT1

Nextera Adelaide/Bornish/Jericho transmission OEB Application – file for ‘Observer’ or ‘Intervener’ status

oebPlease read through this letter from Nextera and the attached Notice of Application to the Ontario Energy Board. This is important for anyone in the Adelaide, Bornish, Jericho and Cedar Wind Point Projects.

If you haven’t filed as an ‘Observer’ or ‘Intervener’ in this hearing, please do so now (before March 24 if possible).

This is the OEB hearing on the 115kV transmission lines on 100′ poles along Kerwood and Elginfield/Nairn Rd AND the substations and switching stations. There are MANY concerns to be raised on this development – make sure your voice is heard and you are involved.

Plympton-Wyoming hires environmental lawyer

161_gillespieePaul Morden, Sarnia Observer
Plympton-Wyoming has hired a lawyer to defend its wind turbine bylaws from a court challenge by Suncor Energy Products. Mayor Lonny Napper said Toronto-based environmental lawyer Eric Gillespie is representing the town in the suit, launched recently by the company planning to build up to 46 turbines as part of its Cedar Point Wind Power project in Plympton-Wyoming, Lambton Shores and Warwick Township.

Plympton-Wyoming’s bylaws include tough rules for wind farms, including a 2-km separation from neighbouring homes. Ontario only requires a 550-metre setback.

“He came highly recommended,” Napper said of Gillespie who has experience in wind energy cases. “We had a meeting with him and we’re very pleased with the outcome.” Napper said court dates haven’t been set yet. “We’re not pulling back,” he said about the town’s resolve to defend its bylaws.

“We feel stronger about this now than we ever did before.” Read article

Suncor going to court over wind farm setbacks

suncorPaul Morden, Sarnia Observer
Suncor is taking Plympton-Wyoming to court over the town’s wind turbine bylaws, including a requirement they be at least 2 km from neighbouring homes. Suncor Energy Products has a contract to sell the province energy from the up to 46-turbine Cedar Point Wind Power project it plans to build in Plympton-Wyoming, Lambton Shores and Warwick Township. The company launched its legal challenge of Plympton-Wyoming’s bylaws in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Sarnia at the same time it’s working through Ontario’s environmental approval process for the wind farm that would stretch from Camlachie north to Ravenswood Line.

“We expected this,” said Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper. “We’re ready to defend our bylaws.” Ontario’s Green Energy Act took planning approvals for wind farms out of the hands of municipal councils but Plympton-Wyoming pressed ahead by passing a series of bylaws to control wind projects, including setting its own 2-km setback. Ontario only requires that wind turbines be at least 550 metres from neighbouring homes.

Suncor spokesperson Jason Vaillant said the company has been working with the municipality on the issue since 2006. “We have talked to them recently about their bylaws and we feel that they are in conflict with the process that has been laid out for us by the province,” he said. Read article

Suncor taking Plympton Wyoming to court over turbine setbacks

suncor CedarPoint_WebMap3_ProjectLocation_20130127Heather Wright, Sarnia Lambton Independent
The wind war in Plympton-Wyoming is headed to court. And Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper says his municipality will fight to protect its residents against the potential health effects of wind turbines on its residents.

Suncor Energy has a contract with the provincial government for a 100 megawatt, 46 turbine project in Plympton-Wyoming and Lambton Shores. About 28 of those turbines will go in Plympton-Wyoming in the Camlachie area. The municipality has taken an aggressive stand against the project putting in tough local regulations.

Thursday, Suncor Energy Products served the township with notice it’s challenging the municipality’s bylaws which require turbines to be two kilometers from homes, a $200,000 deposit for decommissioning and its building permit fees of $10,000. A court date has not been set yet, but Mayor Lonny Napper the township is hiring a lawyer to defend its bylaws. “We feel we have a strong case here,” says Napper. “It is our mandate under the Municipal Act to protect our people and that’s what we’re going to do.

“We’re not against wind turbines; we’re in this strictly for the health and safety of our people.” Read article

Suncor Cedar Point Final Meetings April 2,3,4

suncor CedarPoint_WebMap3_ProjectLocation_20130127Suncor Cedar Point Final Public Meetings
Project Documents – 62 wind turbines
Date
: April 2
Time: 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Place: Camlachie community Centre, 6767 Camlachie Road, Camlachie MAP

Date: April 3
Time: 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Place: Legacy Recreation Centre, 16 Allen Street, Thedford MAP

Date: April 4
Time: 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Place: Centennial Hall, 101 Centennial Ave., Watford, MAP

Plan calls for up to 46 turbines

2013 MLWAG mapPaul Morden, London Free Press
Plympton-Wyoming will defend its turbine bylaw if it isn’t honoured by Suncor in its plans for the Cedar Point wind farm, says Mayor Lonny Napper.

While the province only requires wind turbines to be at least 550 metres away from neighbouring homes, Plympton-Wyoming council passed a bylaw calling for them to be no closer than 2 km.

Suncor is holding three public meetings in early April for its Cedar Point Wind Power project, proposed for Plympton-Wyoming, Lambton Shores and Warwick Township.

The company already has a contract to sell Ontario electricity from the project that calls for as many as 46 turbines to be built in rural areas, from Camlachie north to Ravenswood Line.

Some of its turbines would intermingle with Nextera Energy’s 92-turbine Jericho wind farm planned for Lambton Shores and Warwick. Read the rest of this entry

Anti-wind groups watching transmission line battle

Zephyr1201240015by Heather Wright, Sarnia This Week
Middlesex Lambton Wind Action is closely watching talks between Middlesex County and NextEra Energy. NextEra has several wind projects in Middlesex and Lambton County. It’s planning to build transmission lines to carry the energy created by the turbines in southern Ontario and it wants to build them on municipal and county right of ways.

NextEra recently went to Middlesex County Council to talk about the plan. Draft documents from the Jericho project, with 92 turbines in Lambton Shores and Warwick, show the transmission lines would also stretch into Lambton County. Lambton County Councilors recently gave county staff authority to negotiate with wind energy companies about access to county right of ways.

Esther Wrightman of Middlesex Lambton Wind Action says NextEra wants to build a separate line of polls to carry the energy being produced because Hydro One would not allow NextEra’s lines on their poles. In some areas, that could mean Hydro One poles on one side of the road and NextEra’s on the other.

“A good portion of our county roads will have poles on each side of the road,” she says. “You just double the chance of hitting a pole (in an accident) by putting poles on the other side of the road, too.” Middlesex County engineers have asked NextEra to come back to the county with plans from an engineer. Wrightman is pleased, saying the transmission lines will have a devastating effect on the landscape of rural Ontario.

“They will be running by people’s homes, near schools; it is very invasive, it is going to drastically change the community.” She’s also concerned about the infrastructure left behind “white elephants with transmission lines running down your road” she calls them, should the energy companies pull the turbines out of service. Read the rest of this entry

Lambton Shores to use development agreements to mitigate wind problems

Heather Wright, Sarnia This Week
Lambton Shores plans to use a development agreement to spare municipal taxpayers any unforeseen costs from industrial wind farms now in the planning stages. Suncor Energy and NextEra have two large green energy projects planned for the community with over 100 industrial turbines being erected.

Residents have voiced opposition to the plans but have also raised concerns about the impact the construction will have on municipal roads, bridge and drains. But municipalities have little control over the projects since the province passed the Green Energy Act. It takes away the municipality’s ability to approve the projects or suggest placement of the turbines.

So Lambton Shores is going through the agreement it usually uses with subdivision developers, thinking of all the possible items to which could come up as the turbines are built. Lambton Shores Clerk Carol Mackenzie says there should be an application fee for the projects to cover staff costs for dealing with the projects. She’s suggested $5,000. Councilor Doug Bonesteel isn’t sure if that would be enough for a review and questioned whether staff could analyse the documents – which are hundreds of pages long. He says the wind companies should pay for that. “If we’re going to be given information from the wind turbine companies, they need to run by Ontario Professional Engineers Association to certify the information is true …spend their money to do it,” he says. Read the rest of this entry

Nextera’s transmission troubles in Middlesex & Lambton

In Middlesex County, Nextera has two wind projects up for final public comment: Adelaide and Bornish, totaling 83 turbines, for now. The company’s plan is to connect these two projects, as well as the 92 turbine Nextera Jericho and 62 Suncor Cedar Point projects, with one massive transmission line. Problem is, the route isn’t figured out yet. Remember, the public is supposed to be filing their final comments right now on  complete project documents, and yet this very significant piece of information isn’t available for the public to comment on, or even view.

The map (above right) shows a ‘proposed’ route – this is all the public, the county, the townships and the Ministry of Environment are supposed to know right now. In fact, this route has not been secured. Landowners refused to sign easements; Hydro Ones said ‘no’ to sharing their poles. And now Nextera is planning to ask Middlesex County council to allow the company to erect their own 90’ poles with 115kv lines on the other side of the county’s road; hoping that council will ignore the significant safety risk that this will pose to regular travelers by doubling the number of hydro poles on county road allowance.

But this isn’t the whole story. Nextera has a plan “C”, lovingly called the “Back Country” route. The locals started cluing into this plan when residents were being approached by CanAcre landmen to sign 100′ transmission easements through the back of their lots— in some cases through mature, hard maple bush. At the final public meeting when company representatives were asked about this route, they twisted away from saying it was so, until they were certain that we were not going to tolerate being lied to. One rep was asked: if they were to use this route, would they not have to have another public meeting to unveil this new plan? Yes, he said they would. But no new meeting has taken place, so we just assumed they were using one of the other routes….until we saw these documents at the MOE office in London (they were only placed on the company’s website 3 days ago, after complaints to the MOE were made). Take a look at pg.11 and on – these are personal notes that the CanAcre landmen took while trying to sign-up the ‘Back Country’ land. Why was this sent to the MOE? Do they intend to still use this route? It would appear that that would still be a big possibility as to this day, CanAcre is still making their rounds in the community, trying to get the land signed that they need.

What would this ‘Back Country’ route look like? Nextera of course does not have a map available, but residents were able to piece it together by basically following the plow lines in the fields and assembling the map below. The Red line is the “Back country” and the Yellow is the current Proposed Line. Be sure to follow those lines, right through the woodlot— and remember this is supposed to be ‘green energy’.

Does it not fly in the face of reason that council and the public are only now being shown all the various transmission routes that this company is contemplating? We are in the middle of the final 30 day comment periods for both the Bornish and Adelaide projects – this is the last time the Ministry of Environment allows us to comment on these projects. If the MOE has truly reviewed all of Nextera’s Bornish and Adelaide Project Documents, and deemed them complete so that we could review them – does it not seem like they may be missing a large piece of the puzzle, of WHERE the transmission lines are going? We know of three different transmission routes: on Hydro One’s poles, on the other side of the county road, and the ‘back country route’ – all of which are still being actively pursued by the wind company. We are being asked to comment on incomplete and unavailable information… or perhaps they do not wish to have the public’s comments and that is why we are left out of the decision making.

Nextera approaching Middlesex County Council for road allowance- 115kv Transmission Lines

Date: November 27
Time: 1:00 pm
Place: Middlesex County Building, 399 Ridout St. North, London MAP

Nextera Letter to Middlesex County Council

Nextera is seeking use of Middlesex County’s road allowance for their own personal 115kv transmission line to connec the Adelaide, Jericho and Bornish wind projects, or so they think for now. You see, they have several plans inplay, and even though the wind projects are in their final days of public comment period, the wind company still does not have a transmission route figured out. They seem to be under the illusion that we don’t need/want to comment on this as well?

This proposal to county council asks that we allow the double lining our roads with hydro poles, doubling the safety risk for road traffic. They will be 90′ poles, erected in front of residents homes and farms. For who? For a company from Florida. Be there to say NO!

Wind farm setback ignored

by Paul Morden, The Sarnia Observer
The mayor of Plympton-Wyoming says he’s disappointed Suncor Energy isn’t following the town’s two-kilometre setback requirement in plans for its Cedar Point Wind Power Project.

While Ontario’s Green Energy Act removed municipal control of planning approvals for renewable energy projects, Plympton-Wyoming passed a bylaw calling for wind turbines to be built no closer than two kilometres from neighbouring homes. The province only requires 550-metres.

“I was hoping they would abide by our bylaw and set them at the required distance we were looking for,” Mayor Lonny Napper said. “I was disappointed with that.” Read the rest of this entry

Cedar Point Suncor Project Meetings Aug 21, 22, 23

Date:  August 21
Time: 6 – 9 pm
Place: Camlachie Community Centre, 6767 Camlachie Rd,  Camlachie MAP

Date: August 22
Time: 6 – 9 pm
Place: Forest Legion Branch 176, 58 Albert St, Forest MAP

Date: August 23
Time: 6 – 9 pm
Place: Watford Centennial Hall 101 Centennial Ave., Watford MAP

100 MW; 62 wind turbines.

Project Documents

Map of  Project Boundary Changes

Massive line clears way for wind projects

GREEN ENERGY: $700-million project completed
By JOHN MINER, The London Free Press

Completion of the biggest transmission line project in Ontario in 20 years clears an important hurdle for a series of massive wind turbine projects in Southwestern Ontario, including eight within 70 kilometres of London.

Completed six months ahead of schedule, the $700-million Bruce to Milton transmission project will allow electricity to flow from refurbished reactors at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station, and from wind and solar projects that have received conditional contracts under Ontario’s green energy program. Read the rest of this entry

They sound homey — they aren’t

By JOHN MINER, The London Free Press
GREEN ENERGY: Don’t be fooled by the names of many of the massive wind farms sprouting up across Southwestern Ontario. There’s a local ring to them, but they’re actually owned by multinationals as far-flung as Calgary, Florida and China, to name a few. John Miner reports.

The names have a comforting, familiar ring — Adelaide, Bluewater, Goshen, Bornish. Jericho.

But if you’re looking for who controls the massive wind farms under development in this part of Ontario, you won’t find their head office anywhere close to their local namesakes.

While incorporated as separate companies with local-sounding names, the real control of these wind farms resides in Juno Beach, Fla., home to NextEra Energy, the third largest nuclear power company in the U.S. and the largest industrial wind company in North America.

NextEra Energy owns Florida Power and Light and NextEra Energy Resources, which owns NextEra Energy Canada. It, in turn, owns the planned Adelaide Wind Farm, as well as neighbouring Bornish, Goshen and Jericho.

It’s a similar story for much of the fresh wave of wind farms that have won contracts with the Ontario government. Read the rest of this entry

A wind company’s view of N. Lambton County

If Nextera  and Suncor ruled the world, what would Lambton county look like? Well, they’d like to see this:

NextEra’s ‘double secret’ transmission line

So when a Final Public Meeting for a wind project is published, with a map of the turbine locations and transmission lines, you most likely think, “Well, it’s set in stone”. Or at the very least you’ll think that the wind company is giving the full story, you know… ACCURATE information, after all what’s the point in the public commenting on INACCURATE info? But what if the company doesn’t quite have all it’s info together and they are scrambling to meet deadlines? They wouldn’t LIE to you now, would they– you know, kinda ‘fudge’ the details? They wouldn’t, say, have their transmission lines go down a completely different line then what is shown on their ‘public notice’ map….would they?

Oh of course they would. Especially if the company name is NextEra. Take a look at what is developing for the NextEra Projects in Middlesex and Lambton counties (Adelaide 38 turbines, Bornish 45 turbines and Jericho 92 turbines = 175 turbines total). They are hooking all these projects together with one transmission line that NextEra has to build. Apparently easier said than done as landowners are telling them to shove their $60 000 easement offers you know where.

Judging by the NextEra easement options being requested and signed in the area, the transmission line is not going down Nairn Rd as the ‘public’ maps shows,  it’s cutting through the back lots between Nairn Rd. and Coldstream Rd. That isn’t a clear path of nothing land – they plan to cut 100ft right-of-ways through Hard (Sugar) Maple bush – and lots of it. That’s how ‘green’ these projects are. Wherever they can get their lines through, that’s where they will go, it doesn’t matter what they destroy to make this happen.

Parkhill & Forest Wind Information Meetings

Parkhill  Wind Info Meeting
Date: June 13
Time: 7:00PM
Place: North Middlesex District Community Centre, 225 McLeod St., Parkhill MAP

Forest  Wind Info Meeting
Date: June 14

Time: 7:00PM
Place: Forest Legion Branch 176, 58 Albert St, Forest MAP

Speakers

1. Health: Noise, Shadow Flicker, Dirty Electricity
Barbara Ashbee & Lorrie Gillis
– Lorrie is an outspoken Grey Highlands advocate, who is also the process administrator for ‘Wind Voice;’ a self reporting group on the health effects of wind turbines. Lorrie will speak to the community about those currently suffering from health issues resulting from Industrial Wind Development. Barb is a former Shelburne area resident, whose home was bought out by the Wind Developer, after it became un-liveable due to the surrounding wind turbines. Barb will provide a heart wrenching account of her family’s experience.

2. Economics: Viability
Richard Wakefield – After much experience with the current hydro prices, Richard developed the blog “Ontario Wind Performance,” which provides data on the actual physical performance of Wind Turbines in Ontario. Richard, through his research, challenges many of the claims made in favour of wind power and will speak on the viability of wind power in Ontario.

3. Property Value: Real Estate
Doug Pedlar
– Doug is a Broker of Record for RE/MAX Bluewater Realty in the Grand Bend area. Doug has many years as a respected realtor within the community, and will speak on the effects that industrial wind turbines currently have on property values, and how the industrialization of the local community will impact its residents’ property values.