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Wind farm hits more turbulence

By Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer Thursday, April 5, 2012

Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper says he welcomes a citizens’ group that’s formed to fight Suncor Energy’s plan for a 100 MW wind farm.

Plympton-Wyoming and neighbouring Lambton Shores could be home to up to 62 wind turbines proposed for the company’s Cedar Point Wind Power Project.

Several residents of Plympton-Wyoming formed We’re Against Industrial Turbines (WAIT) soon after Suncor announced it’s holding a public meeting April 18, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the Camlachie Community Centre, said to Ron Schenk, WAIT’s communications director and a member of town council.

“I’ve encouraged groups to form,” Napper said. “I’ve always felt that it’s best fought by the people, rather than the councils of the day.

“There’s a lot of people power out there, and they’re not restricted by the Municipal Act on how they can meet. I think it’s great they’re forming this group.”

WAIT has a website – www.wait-pw.ca  – and is collecting signatures and volunteers. Read the rest of this entry

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Suncor @ Plympton-Wyoming council Wed. March 14

Plympton-Wyoming – Mark on your calendar for this Wednesday

 

SUNCOR presenting @ Council meeting

Date: March 14th
Time: 10:30am

 

This didn’t take long after their botched bribefest….. Please try to be there. Council needs to feel the pressure of the community watching. Suncor needs to know they aren’t welcome.  

Municipality wants $200K deposits for wind turbines

Mayor of Plympton-Wyoming says bylaw protects residents
CBC News  Mar 5, 2012 8:50 AM ET 

A Lambton County municipality is making sure it won’t get stuck with the bill if developers walk away from industrial wind farms.

Plympton-Wyoming, east of Sarnia, passed a tough new bylaw that requires developers to deposit $200,000 for each wind turbine they want to build.

“We need to make sure that residents are not on the hook to rebuild roads or to take down turbines when the subsidies are gone and everybody takes off,” said Marcelle Brooks is with Middlesex Lambton Wind Concerns.

Mayor Lonny Napper said council is just trying to protect its people in case developers walk away from the used turbines in 30 years.

“Some of these companies, they come in and some of their credentials may be a little weak and we don’t want to be left holding the bag with a whole bunch of wind turbines out here,” he said. “We feel we owe it to our taxpayers and we owe it to Ontario if they’re dumped in our lap.”

The biggest development proposed in the municipality is a 29-turbine installation by Suncor. That translates into $5.8 million dollars in deposits.

Plympton-Wyoming also passed a bylaw saying a turbine has to be 2 km away from a home. The provincial guideline is 550 metres.

Napper is not sure if the municipality can enforce the setback distance.

Getting tough on turbines – Plympton-Wyoming

Plympton-Wyoming wants big money from wind operators

By Heather Wright  Sarnia This Week

PLYMPTON-WYOMING – Plympton-Wyoming says industrial wind turbine operators will have to put down a $200,000 deposit for each of the massive energy makers before any soil is turned.

It’s one of two new standards the township council passed recently in an effort to “protect our people,” according to Plympton-Wyoming Mayor Lonny Napper.

After the province passed the Green Energy Act, municipalities had very little say in where or how many industrial wind turbines would be erected in the territory. Suncor currently plans a 29 turbine project in Plympton-Wyoming, a move Napper is worried about.

In January, council passed the bylaw calling for the $200,000 deposit reasoning there had to be money available so the turbines could be dismantled if, in 20 years, the original owners abandon the machinery.

For Suncor, that would mean cutting a $5.8 million check to Plympton-Wyoming.

“We thought with all the companies coming in – we don’t know these companies – if the turbines have to be removed, it gives you some security,” says Napper. “We want the assurance that if some company comes in and puts up forty of them, (and) they’re gone – when they are worn out – what do you do with them? Read the rest of this entry